Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

New Bill on E15 Gives Big Oil Companies 'Get out of Jail Free' Card

Energy
New Bill on E15 Gives Big Oil Companies 'Get out of Jail Free' Card

Friends of the Earth

Legislation introduced March 29 in both the U.S. House and Senate would provide liability protection for oil companies, gas retailers and engine manufacturers against any engine damage resulting from consumers' use of E15, a gasoline blended with 15 percent ethanol. The bill, known as the "Domestic Fuels Act of 2012," would encourage the transition of E15 into the U.S. marketplace despite overwhelming evidence that the fuel will severely damage small engines, void consumer warranties and pollute drinking water.

Michal Rosenoer, biofuels policy campaigner at Friends of the Earth, had the following statement in response:

"Gas prices are shooting up and big oil executives are making millions, while parents can't afford to get their kids to school. We're already subsidizing Big Oil with billions of taxpayer dollars and mandating the use of polluting, inefficient corn ethanol in our fuel. Now some members of Congress are excusing oil companies from paying for the damage caused by their dirty fuel and sticking American consumers with the bill.

"Senator Hoeven, Representative Shimkus and others in Congress seem more concerned with safeguarding oil company profits than protecting millions of Americans from a fuel that will damage their engines, void warranties and harm the environment."

For more information, click here.

Former U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry is seen on October 19, 2015 in Madrid, Spain. Denis Doyle / Getty Images

President-elect Joe Biden announced Monday that former Secretary of State John Kerry will sit on his National Security Council (NSC) as Special Presidential Envoy for Climate.

Read More Show Less

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Susanna Pershern / Submerged Resources Center/ National Park Service / public domain

By Melissa Gaskill

Two decades ago scientists and volunteers along the Virginia coast started tossing seagrass seeds into barren seaside lagoons. Disease and an intense hurricane had wiped out the plants in the 1930s, and no nearby meadows could serve as a naturally dispersing source of seeds to bring them back.

Read More Show Less

Trending

Fridays for Future climate activists demonstrate in Bonn, Germany on Sept. 25, 2020. Roberto Pfeil / picture alliance via Getty Images

Carbon dioxide levels in the atmosphere hit a new record in 2019 and have continued climbing this year, despite lockdowns and other measures to curb the pandemic, the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) said on Monday, citing preliminary data.

Read More Show Less
The Argentine black-and-white tegu is an invasive species that can reach four-feet long. Mark Newman / Getty Images

These black-and-white lizards could be the punchline of a joke, except the situation is no laughing matter.

Read More Show Less
Smoke covers the skies over downtown Portland, Oregon, on Sept. 9, 2020. Diego Diaz / Icon Sportswire

By Isabella Garcia

September in Portland, Oregon, usually brings a slight chill to the air and an orange tinge to the leaves. This year, it brought smoke so thick it burned your throat and made your eyes strain to see more than 20 feet in front of you.

Read More Show Less