Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

New Ad Campaign Blasts U.S. Chamber's ‘Desperate' Attempts to Kill Clean Power Plan

Energy
New Ad Campaign Blasts U.S. Chamber's ‘Desperate' Attempts to Kill Clean Power Plan

A new ad campaign from the League of Conservation Voters characterizes the recent behavior of the U.S. Chamber of Commerce and other fossil fuel supporters and donors with three D's—dirty, desperate and dangerous.

The $250,000 "Desperate" campaign blasts the U.S. Chamber of Commerce and its allies’ attempts to kill the Environmental Protection Agency's emissions proposal in advance of next week's public hearings in Atlanta, Pittsburgh, Denver and Washington D.C. The ad is in response to the analysis from Chamber and U.S. House of Representatives Speaker John Boehner (R-OH) stating that the power plan would cost the country more than 224,000 jobs and $17 billion in electricity bill costs.

“The U.S. Chamber of Commerce’s phony analysis of the EPA’s Clean Power Plan should be shelved under ‘Fiction,’ LCV President Gene Karpinski said in a statement announcing the campaign. "Politicians like Speaker Boehner should be ashamed for doing the bidding of polluters and pedaling its proven lies to just help their campaign contributors make even more money.”

Several of the Chamber’s largest donors are fossil fuel companies and its board of directors includes senior officials from ConocoPhillips, Phillips 66, big coal producer Alliance Resource Partners, CONSOL Energy, and Southern Company.

The LCV ad campaign airs this week in the four markets where the EPA hearings will be held.

By Frank La Sorte and Kyle Horton

Millions of birds travel between their breeding and wintering grounds during spring and autumn migration, creating one of the greatest spectacles of the natural world. These journeys often span incredible distances. For example, the Blackpoll warbler, which weighs less than half an ounce, may travel up to 1,500 miles between its nesting grounds in Canada and its wintering grounds in the Caribbean and South America.

Read More Show Less

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Kevin Maillefer / Unsplash

By Lynne Peeples

Editor's note: This story is part of a nine-month investigation of drinking water contamination across the U.S. The series is supported by funding from the Park Foundation and Water Foundation. Read the launch story, "Thirsting for Solutions," here.

In late September 2020, officials in Wrangell, Alaska, warned residents who were elderly, pregnant or had health problems to avoid drinking the city's tap water — unless they could filter it on their own.

Read More Show Less

Trending

Eat Just's cell-based chicken nugget is now served at Singapore restaurant 1880. Eat Just, Inc.

At a time of impending global food scarcity, cell-based meats and seafood have been heralded as the future of food.

Read More Show Less
New Zealand sea lions are an endangered species and one of the rarest species of sea lions in the world. Art Wolfe / Photodisc / Getty Images

One city in New Zealand knows what its priorities are.

Dunedin, the second largest city on New Zealand's South Island, has closed a popular road to protect a mother sea lion and her pup, The Guardian reported.

Read More Show Less

piyaset / iStock / Getty Images Plus

In an alarming new study, scientists found that climate change is already harming children's diets.

Read More Show Less