Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Help Support EcoWatch

Net Metering Debate and a Green DJ: ‘SoCal Connected' Examines Going Solar in California

Business
Net Metering Debate and a Green DJ: ‘SoCal Connected' Examines Going Solar in California

Most of the time, the people telling you about the benefits of solar energy are part of advocacy groups or legislators with constituents to represent. KCET's SoCal Connected switched things up, taking us to the home of somebody who has actually invested in solar panels.

In this week's episode, we catch a glimpse of electronic DJ Morgan Page's home studio, which allows him to make "music from the sun." Page further lives the green dream by driving a Tesla, charged daily with the solar panels, of course.

"It's just sort of quietly working in the background," Page said of his power system. "You almost can't even see it from the street—it's kind of invisible—which is what I kind of like with technology. It's working in the background. It's saving money on the power bill and it's not an eyesore."

The clip also explains net energy metering, which requires utilities to repay customers like Page when their panels produce more power than is needed, making way for an offset energy bill. It's an incentive to go renewable, though companies like Arizona Public Service wanted to do away with it for obvious, financial reasons.

Sheila Bowers of Solar Done Right makes the argument for transitioned to community-based microgrids, instead of the massive grid platform she believes is now antiquated.

"Any way we want to add clean energy and modernize the grid, it's going to be expensive," she said. "The question is, where do we put the money? Do we put it into this 19th century model or do we put it into the model of the future?"

The Emmy Award-winning SoCal Connected airs at 8 p.m. Wednesdays on KCET.

 

A grim new assessment of the world's flora and fungi has found that two-fifths of its species are at risk of extinction as humans encroach on the natural world, as The Guardian reported. That puts the number of species at risk near 140,000.

Read More Show Less

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Flowers like bladderwort have changed their UV pigment levels in response to the climate crisis. Jean and Fred / CC BY 2.0

As human activity transforms the atmosphere, flowers are changing their colors.

Read More Show Less

Trending

A factory in Newark, N.J. emits smoke in the shadow of NYC on January 18, 2018. Kena Betancur / VIEWpress / Corbis / Getty Images

By Sharon Zhang

Back in March, when the pandemic had just planted its roots in the U.S., President Donald Trump directed the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to do something devastating: The agency was to indefinitely and cruelly suspend environmental rule enforcement. The EPA complied, and for just under half a year, it provided over 3,000 waivers that granted facilities clemency from state-level environmental rule compliance.

Read More Show Less
A meteoroid skims the earth's atmosphere on Sept. 22, 2020. European Space Agency

A rare celestial event was caught on camera last week when a meteoroid "bounced" off Earth's atmosphere and veered back into space.

Read More Show Less
A captive elephant is seen at Howletts Wild Animal Park in Littlebourne, England. Suvodeb Banerjee / Flickr / CC by 2.0

By Bob Jacobs

Hanako, a female Asian elephant, lived in a tiny concrete enclosure at Japan's Inokashira Park Zoo for more than 60 years, often in chains, with no stimulation. In the wild, elephants live in herds, with close family ties. Hanako was solitary for the last decade of her life.

Read More Show Less

Support Ecowatch