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Neil deGrasse Tyson Schools Rapper B.o.B. Who Believes the Earth Is Flat

Science

Rapper B.o.B. is the latest celebrity to take to Twitter to promote the "Flat Earth" theory, which has no support in the modern scientific community.

His evidence includes "Why is the horizon always at eye level?," "Why aren't planes constantly flying into space?" and "Why can you see Philadelphia from New Jersey?" Here is a sampling of his Tweets claiming the Earth is, in fact, flat:

Famed astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson couldn't help but chime in, debunking the rapper's claims about the Earth's curve and whether or not Polaris is visible in the Southern Hemisphere.

He even added a burn in at the end:

But Tyson was sure to let him know he's still a fan of his music with the most veiled compliment ever:

Rapper B.o.B. is not the only celebrity who has recently espoused the "Flat Earth" theory. Earlier this month, reality TV star Tila Tequila took to Twitter, claiming that no one has been able to prove her wrong that the Earth is flat. Pythagoras is rolling over in his grave.

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