Quantcast

Nebraska Farmers Sue Monsanto Alleging Roundup Gave Them Cancer

GMO

Four Nebraskan agricultural workers have filed a lawsuit against Monsanto Co. alleging that the agribusiness giant's cancer-linked product, Roundup, gave them non-Hodgkin lymphoma after many years of exposure.

The plaintiffs have also accused Monsanto of purposely misleading consumers about the safety of its blockbuster product, which contains glyphosate as its controversial main ingredient.

The plaintiffs allege that Monsanto mislabeled the product in defiance of the "body of recognized scientific evidence linking the disease to exposure to Roundup."

Glyphosate, the most widely used herbicide in the world was infamously classified as "probably carcinogenic to humans" by the World Health Organization's (WHO) International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) in March 2015.

“Case-control studies of occupational exposure in the USA, Canada, and Sweden reported increased risks for non-Hodgkin lymphoma that persisted after adjustment for other pesticides,” the IARC said about the herbicide, adding that there is also “convincing evidence” that it can cause cancer in laboratory animals.

The plaintiffs in the case are farmers Larry Domina and Robert Dickey both of Cedar County, York County farmer Royce Janzen and Dodge County agronomist Frank Pollard, the Lincoln Journal Star reported. They are represented by Omaha-based Domina Law Group and New York-based Weitz & Luxembourg.

"Roundup is used by Nebraskans raising everything from grain to grass and tulips to trees. Nothing on the label alerts users to health risks," their attorney David Domina told Courthouse News. He said that Nebraskans deserve the benefit of the WHO's research and protection against unknown exposure.

Monsanto has vehemently denied cancer claims and said that Roundup is "safe enough to drink," as the farmers pointed out in their federal lawsuit.

Roundup, which brought the St. Louis-based business $4.8 billion in revenue last year, is applied to "Roundup Ready" crops around that world that are genetically modified to resist applications of the powerful weedkiller.

According to the farmers' complaint, the ubiquitous product is used in commercial agriculture on more than 100 varieties of crops, with more than 85 million pounds. of glyphosate applied to crops grown in the U.S. in 2001 and skyrocketing to 185 million pounds by 2007.

"Glyphosate is found in rivers, streams, and groundwater in agricultural areas where Roundup is used. It has been found in food, the urine of exposed persons, and in the urine of urban dwellers without direct contact with glyphosate," the complaint states.

The farmers are seeking punitive damages for defective design, failure to warn, negligence and breach of warranty.

Monsanto spokeswoman Charla Lord told Courthouse News in an email that "while we have sympathy for the plaintiffs, the science simply does not support their claims when it comes to glyphosate."

"The U.S. EPA and other pesticide regulators around the world have reviewed numerous long-term carcinogenicity studies and agree that there is no evidence that glyphosate causes cancer, even at very high doses," she continued. "Since 1991, glyphosate has been classified by the U.S. EPA in its lowest category for evidence of non-carcinogenicity based on extensive animal studies. In fact, glyphosate is one of the most thoroughly studied herbicides in the marketplace."

Incidentally, last month, the EPA’s Cancer Assessment Review Committee published a report online about glyphosate concluding that the chemical is not likely carcinogenic to humans. However, even though it was marked “Final” and was signed by 13 members of CARC, the report disappeared from the website three days later. The EPA said that the report was “inadvertently” released.

The chemical has been the subject of incredible controversy in Europe especially after the European Food Safety Authority famously rejected the IARC’s classification of glyphosate as a possible carcinogen in November.

Activists have been relabelling bottles of Monsanto's Roundup weedkiller in garden centers and DIY shops across the UK. Roundup contains glyphosate, a chemical that the WHO has shown to be "probably carcinogenic." Photo credit: Global Justice Now

The European Commission—the executive body of the European Union—reportedly plans to relicense glyphosate for nine years despite opposition from European Parliament, which voted on April 13 to oppose EU relicensing. Additionally, countries such as France, Sweden, Italy, the Netherlands and now Germany, as well as 1.4 million people have called on an EU ban of glyphosate.

Meanwhile, Monsanto is facing a mounting number of similar cancer lawsuits.

In March, a wrongful death lawsuit was filed against Monsanto by the widow of a prominent Cambria, California farmer alleging that Roundup caused her husband of 40-years, Anthony Jackson “Jack” McCall, to develop a rare and aggressive version of non-Hodgkin lymphoma after he used the herbicide on his 20-acre fruit and vegetable farm for nearly 30 years.

In February, the Hawaii Tribune-Herald reported that Christine and Kenneth Sheppard, the former owners of Dragon’s Lair Kona Coffee Farm in Honaunau, Hawaii, have accused the multinational agribusiness of falsely masking the carcinogenic risks of glyphosate and is responsible for causing the woman’s cancer, non-Hodgkins lymphoma.

Last year, California announced plans to become the first state to label glyphosate as a carcinogen based on the IARC's classification. Monsanto has fought back against the Golden State with their own lawsuit.

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

Consumed: First Fictional Film to Cover Concerns of GMOs

Results of Glyphosate Pee Test Are in ‘And It’s Not Good News’

Monsanto Faces Rejection in U.S. Over GMO Soybean

Does Glyphosate Cause Cancer? 

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Aerial assessment of Hurricane Sandy damage in Connecticut. Dannel Malloy / Flickr / CC BY 2.0

Extreme weather events supercharged by climate change in 2012 led to nearly 1,000 more deaths, more than 20,000 additional hospitalizations, and cost the U.S. healthcare system $10 billion, a new report finds.

Read More Show Less
Giant sequoia trees at Sequoia National Park, California. lucky-photographer / iStock / Getty Images Plus

A Bay Area conservation group struck a deal to buy and to protect the world's largest remaining privately owned sequoia forest for $15.6 million. Now it needs to raise the money, according to CNN.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
This aerial view shows the Ogasayama Sports Park Ecopa Stadium, one of the venues for 2019 Rugby World Cup. MARTIN BUREAU / AFP / Getty Images

The Rugby World Cup starts Friday in Japan where Pacific Island teams from Samoa, Fiji and Tonga will face off against teams from industrialized nations. However, a new report from a UK-based NGO says that when the teams gather for the opening ceremony on Friday night and listen to the theme song "World In Union," the hypocrisy of climate injustice will take center stage.

Read More Show Less
Vera_Petrunina / iStock / Getty Images Plus

By Wudan Yan

In June, New York Times journalist Andy Newman wrote an article titled, "If seeing the world helps ruin it, should we stay home?" In it, he raised the question of whether or not travel by plane, boat, or car—all of which contribute to climate change, rising sea levels, and melting glaciers—might pose a moral challenge to the responsibility that each of us has to not exacerbate the already catastrophic consequences of climate change. The premise of Newman's piece rests on his assertion that traveling "somewhere far away… is the biggest single action a private citizen can take to worsen climate change."

Read More Show Less
Volunteer caucasian woman giving grain to starving African children. Bartosz Hadyniak / E+ / Getty Images

By Frances Moore Lappé

Food will be scarce, expensive and less nutritious," CNN warns us in its coverage of the UN's new "Climate Change and Land" report. The New York Times announces that "Climate Change Threatens the World's Food Supply."

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
British Airways 757. Jon Osborne / Flickr / CC BY-SA 2.0

By Adam Vaughan

Two-thirds of people in the UK think the amount people fly should be reined in to tackle climate change, polling has found.

Read More Show Less
Climate Week NYC

On Monday, Sept. 23, the Climate Group will kick off its 11th annual Climate Week NYC, a chance for governments, non-profits, businesses, communities and individuals to share possible solutions to the climate crisis while world leaders gather in the city for the UN Climate Action Summit.

Read More Show Less

By Pam Radtke Russell in New Orleans

Local TV weather forecasters have become foot soldiers in the war against climate misinformation. Over the past decade, a growing number of meteorologists and weathercasters have begun addressing the climate crisis either as part of their weather forecasts, or in separate, independent news reports to help their viewers understand what is happening and why it is important.

Read More Show Less