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Nearly 1,000 Sustainable Corporations Encourage You to ‘B the Change’

Business

The 900-plus Certified B Corporations already embrace social and environmental responsibility on a daily basis, so this week they decided to encourage the rest of the world to do so.

The companies and Wayne, PA-based nonprofit B Lab launched the "B the Change" campaign this week to celebrate and reward those who use business for good, but also raise additional awareness. For the next year, the campaign will be supported by full-page advertisements in publications like Mother Earth News, inviting people to "Take a Deeper Look into the Products You Buy."

Instead of encouraging watchdogs, the deeper look B-Lab suggests is meant to applaud those with sustainable practices. Examples include California-based Indigenous, a Fair Trade fashion designer that uses 100-percent organic materials, and The Honest Co., a seller of eco-friendly baby diapers, wipes, bath and body care products co-founded by Golden Globe-nominated actress Jessica Alba.

The "B the Change" profile of Indigenous Designs. Graphic credit: B Lab

 

The "B the Change" profile of The Honest Co. Graphic credit: B Lab

The advertisements are expected to reach about 5 million people.

“It’s inspiring to see nearly 1,000 companies speaking out with one, unified voice, all in an effort to celebrate and reward people using business as a force for good,” B Lab Co-Founder Jay Coen Gilbert said in a statement

Sixteen B Corps, including BlueAvocado and Pacific Northwest Kale Chips, have created special edition products in "B the Change"-enhanced packaging. The food, jewelry, t-shirts, notebooks, personal care items and home furnishings will be sold online and at large retailers like Whole Foods, Target and Barnes & Noble.

“Through the leadership of these sixteen companies, more people will learn about a better way to do business,” Coen Gilbert said, “and be invited to join a global movement to redefine success in business.”

EcoWatch joined the growing number of B Corps in 2013. “B the Change" is the first joint communications effort by the entire B Corp community, which also includes companies like Ben & Jerry’s, Patagonia, Etsy and Method.

Click here to join the movement.

Visit EcoWatch’s SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS page for more related news on this topic.

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