Quantcast

Nation’s Capital Takes Major Climate Action Step: Unanimously Approves 50% Renewable Energy Target

Energy

By Chesapeake Climate Action Network

The nation's capital took another step toward nation-leading climate action today, as the District of Columbia Council unanimously approved legislation, B21-650, to expand DC's renewable energy target to 50 percent by 2032.

"Today's vote is a major step toward growing the district's clean energy economy," said council member Mary Cheh (Ward 3), lead sponsor of B21-650. "This bill will create good-paying jobs, more affordable energy and healthier air for all district residents."

The bill, which heads to the desk of Mayor Muriel Bowser, sets one of the top-five mandatory clean energy goals in the nation at the state level. By creating incentives for 1,500 Megawatts of new solar and wind power, the bill will quadruple jobs in DC's solar industry, which currently employs 1,000 people. It will also reduce climate pollution at a rate equal to taking 500,000 cars off the road per year.

On top of expanding DC's Renewable Portfolio Standard, the bill establishes a "Solar for All" program that aims to cut the electric bills of 100,000 low-income district households in half by 2032 using clean energy and energy conservation.

"The DC Council is setting an example of strong climate action that leaders on Capitol Hill and across our region should follow," said Mike Tidwell, director of the Chesapeake Climate Action Network. "Solar and wind are the fastest growing sources of power and DC is positioning itself to capture the benefits of cleaner air, thousands of new jobs and a better future for all residents."

Clean energy is already a growing source of power and a driver of economic development in the district. DC's existing renewable energy standard requires 20 percent of the district's electricity to come from renewable sources by 2020, a target the city is on pace to exceed. DC currently has more than 250 clean energy companies, which are positioned to grow under the new policy.

"Washington, DC is already seeing a solar boom and it's about to get a whole lot bigger," said Atta Kiarash, construction manager at DC-based Solar Solution. "Today's vote will create an estimated 4,000 new DC jobs in the solar industry that pay middle class wages and offer career pathways for DC workers."

The bill passed today will assist DC's low-income residents in particular. Low-income households spend a high proportion of their income on energy bills. By connecting low-income families to low-cost clean energy and money-saving energy efficiency upgrades, the bill will help DC residents cover basic needs like food, housing and education. More clean energy will also reduce toxic air pollution that disproportionately impacts the health of low-income people and people of color.

"With Mayor Bowser's signature, DC will join the ranks of a number of cities and states leading a clean energy revolution," said Chris Weiss, executive director of the DC Environmental Network. "The DC Council is taking the steps necessary to more aggressively curb carbon emissions that cause climate change. Additionally, the Solar for All program will make sure clean and affordable renewable energy is available to all district residents. The DC Environmental Network urges Mayor Bowser to sign this bill as soon as possible."

DC has more than enough renewable resources at hand to meet and exceed the 50 percent target approved today. DC can meet its higher goal by tapping just 11 percent of the wind power already in queue to be developed in the region. Meanwhile, DC's total solar potential is 2 Gigawatts or four times greater than the 5 percent solar "carve-out" set by the new legislation.

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

'Three Amigos' Vow to Get Half Their Electricity From Clean Power by 2025

Germany Bans Fracking But Does It Go Far Enough?

DNC Platform Calls for Fossil Fuel Investigations, 100% Renewable Energy

TransCanada Files NAFTA Suit Demanding More Than $15 Billion for Keystone XL Rejection

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Wesley Martinez Da Costa / EyeEm / Getty Images

By David R. Montgomery

Would it sound too good to be true if I was to say that there was a simple, profitable and underused agricultural method to help feed everybody, cool the planet, and revitalize rural America? I used to think so, until I started visiting farmers who are restoring fertility to their land, stashing a lot of carbon in their soil, and returning healthy profitability to family farms. Now I've come to see how restoring soil health would prove as good for farmers and rural economies as it would for the environment.

Read More Show Less
skaman306 / Moment / Getty Images

By Jillian Kubala, MS, RD

Radish (Raphanus sativus) is a cruciferous vegetable that originated in Asia and Europe (1Trusted Source).

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
Tinnakorn Jorruang / iStock / Getty Images

By Dan Nosowitz

The budding research on cannabidiol, or CBD, attracts a great deal of interest in the agricultural field.

Read More Show Less
Oksana Khodakovskaia / iStock / Getty Images

By Jillian Kubala, MS, RD

The loquat (Eriobotrya japonica) is a tree native to China that's prized for its sweet, citrus-like fruit.

Read More Show Less

The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) released new numbers that show vaping-related lung illnesses are continuing to grow across the country, as the number of fatalities has climbed to 33 and hospitalizations have reached 1,479 cases, according to a CDC update.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
During the summer, the Arctic tundra is usually a thriving habitat for mammals such as the Arctic fox. Education Images / Universal Images Group via Getty Images

Reports of extreme snowfall in the Arctic might seem encouraging, given that the region is rapidly warming due to human-driven climate change. According to a new study, however, the snow could actually pose a major threat to the normal reproductive cycles of Arctic wildlife.

Read More Show Less
Vegan rice and garbanzo beans meals. Ella Olsson / Pexels

By Alina Petre, MS, RD (CA)

One common concern about vegan diets is whether they provide your body with all the vitamins and minerals it needs.

Many claim that a whole-food, plant-based diet easily meets all the daily nutrient requirements.

Read More Show Less
A fracking well looms over a residential area of Liberty, Colorado on Aug. 19. WildEarth Guardians / Flickr

A new multiyear study found that people living or working within 2,000 feet, or nearly half a mile, of a hydraulic fracturing (fracking) drill site may be at a heightened risk of exposure to benzene and other toxic chemicals, according to research released Thursday by the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment (CDPHE)

Read More Show Less