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Take a Hike Day Is Around the Bend. What's Your Dream Hike?

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Arnold Media / The Image Bank / Getty Images

This Saturday, November 17, is National Take a Hike Day. Hiking is a great way to stay healthy, reconnect with nature and remind yourself of what we're trying to protect. In honor of the day, here are the EcoWatch team's favorite hikes, and the ones at the top of our bucket lists.


Olivia Rosane, Freelance Reporter

Favorite Hike: Hurricane Ridge

Hurricane Ridge is the most accessible mountainous area within Washington State's Olympic National Park. Several hiking trails branch off from the Visitor Center, taking you past alpine meadows, grazing deer and stunning views of the snow-capped Olympics. I hiked here with my family when we first moved to Washington and immediately fell in love with my new home.

Dream Hike: The Long Trail

The Long Trail, the oldest long-distance hiking trail in the U.S., runs along the spine of Vermont's Green Mountains from Massachusetts to the Canadian border. Someday, I would love to take two to three weeks and walk the whole thing, immersing myself in the woods, meadows and streams of one of the greenest states.

Irma Omerhodzic, Associate Editor

Favorite Hike: The Ledges

The Ledges in Cuyahoga Valley National Park in Ohio is only 1.8 miles long, but exploring the Ritchie Ledges is such a cool experience. There are petroglyphs that date back to the 1900s (no one really knows who carved them). My dog and I love taking a day trip here and escaping into nature.

Dream Hike: Cathedral Rock Trail

Sedona, Arizona is a definite bucket-list trip. Sedona is said to be an energy vortex. I would love to hike the Cathedral Rock Trail in Coconino National Forest with the intention to heal at all levels.

Chris McDermott, News Editor

Favorite Hike: Seminole-Wekiva Trail

A rails-to-trails marvel on what once was the longest railroad in the U.S., the 14-mile Seminole-Wekiva Trail is perfect for bicycling, and even better for a slow hike on the Paint the Trail stretch, which is filled with inspired artwork by Jeff Sonksen.

Dream Hike: Mount Fløya, Norway

My dream hike would take at least an hour before encountering the Northern Lights. The location could be flexible, but this lookout over Tromsø in Norway could be even better than the dream.

Lorraine Chow, Freelance Reporter

Favorite Hike: Bear Mountain State Park

Bear Mountain was always the perfect day trip when I used to live in New York City. It's about an hour away by bus from Port Authority. The hike is moderately challenging and has an all-rock section. The peak, hilariously, is a parking lot, but the incredible views on the way are totally worth it.

Dream Hike: Shenandoah Valley

My bucket list hike is the Appalachian Trail, but if I had to choose a stretch it would be in the Shenandoah section. It would also have to be in the fall so I can see the colors. Maybe I'll also get to see a black bear!

Jordan Simmons, Social Media Manager

Favorite Hike: Pachamama

The kind-hearted local I met in the town's center of of Cusco, Peru pointed to a peak in the distance and asked if I'd like to hike to Pachamama, what he called the tallest point in Cusco. We trekked about eight hours away from civilization—passing through eucalyptus forests and drinking water from the stream. We ventured so far that our only way of finding home was to follow water.

Dream Hike: La Ruta de los Conquistadores

My passion to build my knowledge on Indigenous culture drives my desire to hike La Ruta de los Conquistadores (The Route of the Conquistadors) in Costa Rica. The route changes each year and is designed for mountain bikers but I fear such treacherous mountain biking, and I'm determined to hike this path, which traces routes undertaken by 16th century Spanish Conquistadors.

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