Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

450 Groups to Trump: 'Americans Want More Protected Public Lands, Not Less'

Popular
450 Groups to Trump: 'Americans Want More Protected Public Lands, Not Less'

More than 450 organizations representing millions of members across the country sent a letter on Tuesday to President Donald Trump, Interior Sec. Ryan Zinke and Commerce Sec. Wilbur Ross in opposition to any effort to remove or decrease protections for any national monuments.


The letter comes in the wake of the president's executive order to review national monuments created since 1996. Signed by organizations from 38 states and national groups, the letter represents the deep-seated opposition to attacks on national parks, public lands and waters.

"The American people, including the millions of members we represent, overwhelmingly oppose efforts to roll back protections for the parks, monuments, marine sanctuaries and other public lands and waters they love," the letter stated, citing Colorado College's Conservation in the West Poll that 80 percent of western voters support keeping existing national monuments protections in place. "Americans want more protected public lands and waters, not less."

Theresa Pierno, president of the National Park Conservation Association, and other signatories shared the letter with Rep. Raul Grijalva in advance of the House Natural Resources hearing on the Antiquities Act. Pierno noted that, throughout the 120-day review period, Americans are encouraged to participate in "Monumental Mondays" by telling the Trump Administration that an attack on one national monument is an attack on all.

The letter also noted that efforts to shrink or eliminate national monuments will hurt local economies: "Protected public lands and waters are the backbone of this economy and any effort to introduce uncertainty by implying that the national monuments that drive local economies may not be permanent will hurt those gateway communities and businesses that depend on them."

The letter is noteworthy for the diversity and volume of signatories generated in just a few days.

"The sheer diversity of historic, cultural and natural treasures that have been protected by the Antiquities Act is the reason why hundreds of groups representing sportsmen, cultural heritage organizations, evangelicals, conservation, recreation businesses, historic preservation, social justice and many others all oppose efforts to undermine our national monuments and view an attack on any one national monument as an attack on them all," the letter stated.

Offshore oil and gas drillers have left more than 18,000 miles of pipelines at the bottom of the Gulf of Mexico. Drew Angerer / Getty Images

Offshore oil and gas drillers have discarded and abandoned more than 18,000 miles of pipelines on the floor of the Gulf of Mexico since the 1960s, a report from the Government Accountability Office says.

Read More Show Less
EcoWatch Daily Newsletter
Concerns over drinking polluted water top a recent Gallup poll on environmental threats. sonsam / Getty Images

Americans are most worried about water quality compared to other environmental issues, a new Gallup survey finds.

Read More Show Less
Trending
The black cherries of Coffea stenophylla. E. Couturon / IRD, Author provided

By Aaron P Davis

The world loves coffee. More precisely, it loves arabica coffee. From the smell of its freshly ground beans through to the very last sip, arabica is a sensory delight.

Robusta, the other mainstream coffee crop species, is almost as widely traded as arabica, but it falls short on flavor. Robusta is mainly used for instant coffee and blends, while arabica is the preserve of discerning baristas and expensive espressos.

Read More Show Less
Sunrise over planet Earth. Elements of this image furnished by NASA. Elen11 / iStock / Getty Images Plus

On Thursday, April 22, the world will celebrate Earth Day, the largest non-religious holiday on the globe.

Read More Show Less
NASA has teamed up with non-profit Carbon Mapper to help pinpoint greenhouse gas sources. aapsky / Getty Images

NASA is teaming up with an innovative non-profit to hunt for greenhouse gas super-emitters responsible for the climate crisis.

Read More Show Less