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NASA Showcases Beauty of National Parks in Awesome Aerial Images

NASA Showcases Beauty of National Parks in Awesome Aerial Images

In honor of National Parks week last month, NASA created a gallery of satellite images of ten national park lands. These picturesque views remind us why national parks are so special—and why similar places need to be protected.

While the images show distinct features that make these landscapes one-of-a-kind, they can’t speak to the amazing impact these places have on our wellbeing and our economy.

Take a peek at the awe-inspiring aerial views below, all courtesy of NASA:

[blackoutgallery id="333428"]

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