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Must-See Video Shows Reality of California's Historic Drought

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Must-See Video Shows Reality of California's Historic Drought

The Bay Foundation, part of Los Angeles Department of Water and Power′s (LADWP) Community Partnership Grant, put out a public service announcement promoting water conservation with a quick, humorous look at Los Angeles’s water supply.

This clever, one-minute video highlights the tough decisions Californians have to make with the Golden State in its fourth year of drought. A year after first declaring a state of emergency and urging Californians to voluntarily cut water use, Gov. Brown has issued the state's first-ever mandatory water restrictions ordering the State Water Resources Control Board to cut water use by 25 percent.

The April 1 snowpack assessment set a record for the lowest snowpack levels ever at 6 percent of normal (as a comparison, last year it was 24 percent of normal). In mid-March, NASA senior water scientist Jay Famiglietti warned that California "has only about one year of water supply left in its reservoirs, and our strategic backup supply, groundwater, is rapidly disappearing.”

Watch the video here:

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