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MUST SEE TV Ad Reveals the True Costs of Fracking

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MUST SEE TV Ad Reveals the True Costs of Fracking

New Yorkers Against Fracking

As scientists and physicians continue outlining the disastrous health impacts of fracking, New Yorkers Against Fracking today began a new effort to outline the negative economic impacts of fracking. In a new television ad that will air starting tomorrow in the Binghamton and Elmira markets, Pennsylvania residents detail lies the gas industry told and the devastating impacts on property values that came along with fracking.

“I’m holding a mortgage on a home I can’t give away,” says Pam Judy in the ad. Norma Kydamik adds, “You can’t sell because your property is worthless.” Terry Greenwood notes that the gas industry “[ruins] the value of your property.”
 
The ad ends with a call for viewers to call Governor Cuomo at 1-855-675-9300 and urge him to ban fracking.
                                                                                                     
In recent months, over a thousand businesses have joined together to call for a ban on fracking and over 350,000 unique petitions have been delivered to Governor Cuomo urging him to ban fracking.
 
“More and more New Yorkers understand that fracking poses a significant danger to our water and our health,” said Alex Beauchamp from Food and Water Watch, which funded the ads. “Now we are launching a new effort to make sure they know that the oil and gas industry will hurt our already-limping economy aswell.”

Opposition to fracking in New York State has mobilized thousands throughout the state to participate in actions to demonstrate to Governor Cuomo that New Yorkers are not willing to jeopardize public health, the state’s environment, and the state’s economic prosperity by allowing the dangerous practice.
 
Business owners, scientists, artists, and residents of New York have worked togetherwith the diverse organizations in the coalition New Yorkers Against Fracking to highlight the dangers fracking poses and push for a ban of fracking in New York, a call driven by the science, which shows that fracking cannot be done safely.

Visit EcoWatch’s FRACKING page for more related news on this topic.

 

The Forest Vixen's CC Photo Stream. Flickr / CC BY 2.0


Spring is coming. And soon, tree swallows will start building nests. But as the climate changes, the birds are nesting earlier in the spring.


"It's getting warmer overall. They're thinking, OK, it's a good time to breed, to lay my eggs," says Lily Twining of the Max Planck Institute for Animal Behavior in Germany.

She says that despite recent warming, late-season cold snaps remain common. Those cold snaps can harm newborn chicks.

Hatchlings cannot regulate their body temperature, so they are vulnerable to hypothermia. And the insects they eat stop flying in cold weather, potentially leaving the chicks to starve.

"These chicks are growing very, very fast," Twining says. "They have very high energy demands, so… if they don't get a lot of that good high-quality food during this pretty specific time… that's when these cold weather events seem to be most devastating."

For example, data from Ithaca, New York, shows that a single cold snap in 2016 killed more than 70% of baby tree swallows.

"And there have been more and more of these severe cold weather die-off events for these tree swallows as they've been breeding earlier and earlier over the past 40 or so years," Twining says.

So for these songbirds, earlier springs can come with devastating consequences.

Reporting credit: Sarah Kennedy / ChavoBart Digital Media

Reposted with permission from Yale Climate Connections.

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