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Must-See Robert Reich's 2014 Year in Review

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Must-See Robert Reich's 2014 Year in Review

I highly recommend watching Robert Reich's 2014 year in review. "As we head into 2015, it's important to keep in mind how quickly progressive change that seems radical, if not a pipe dream at one point in time, becomes feasible when enough people make a ruckus," says Reich.

From the Keystone XL pipeline to limits on carbon emissions to corporate personhood, Reich covers it all.

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