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MSNBC's ‘Ed Show' Discusses Senate's Latest Scuffle Over a Keystone XL Vote

Energy
MSNBC's ‘Ed Show' Discusses Senate's Latest Scuffle Over a Keystone XL Vote

Republican Senators failed to push a Keystone XL vote through an energy bill a month ago, but that doesn't mean they won't try again.

Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) has asked Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-NV) to hold a vote on a bill that would force approval of the 830,000-barrel-per-day, according to The Associated Press. The possible vote would be a way to circumvent the State Department's indefinite postponement of a decision.

McConnell, Sen. John Barrasso (R-WY) and others face more trouble in getting a vote than Reid's power, however. Federal Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration inspections found that TransCanada failed to employ approved welding procedures during the construction of the southern leg of its already existing Keystone One pipeline. New construction regulations placed on TransCanada late last month seemingly prove advocates and environmentally conscious legislators right—Keystone XL would produce more harm than benefits.

A segment from MSNBC's The Ed Show featured attorney Anthony Swift of the Natural Resources Defense Council and Ring of Fire Radio's Mike Papantonio to discuss the latest round of Keystone turmoil.

 

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