Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Help Support EcoWatch

Moving Beyond Coal: Major Global Grassroots Fights of 2015

Energy
Moving Beyond Coal: Major Global Grassroots Fights of 2015

For the first time in history, the global community has committed to action on climate change. Momentum for the Paris climate agreement has been building with a range of major events signaling that the world is ready to act on climate.

Such events include the historic 2014 People’s Climate March in New York City, landmark climate cooperation agreements between the U.S. and China, Pope Francis’ groundbreaking encyclical and the U.K.’s recent announcement that they will phase out the use of coal in their energy mix within a decade.

Andin community in Myanmar rallies against coal. Photo credit: Hong Sar Ramonya

Thursday, the Sierra Club released its fifth annual report on some of the world’s major, ongoing grassroots coal fights around the world. Wherever there are coal mines, coal shipping ports and power plants around the globe, local communities are fighting back against deadly pollution and economic destruction. Pitted against unimaginable wealth and power and too often facing violence and intimidation, these are the people that refuse to be silent.

This year, we witnessed an ever-changing landscape of communities, governments and companies, committed to transitioning the world from dirty, expensive, dangerous coal to affordable, clean energy. Grassroots communities from around the world have dramatically grown and continued to prove they are a force to be reckoned with. Thanks to their resistance, the false inevitability of coal expansion the coal industry has sought to promote is far from a reality.

This report highlights the following narratives:

  • In Australia, the success of community movement against the Carmichael Mine in Australia’s Galilee basin and the expansion of the Abbot Point terminal on the edge of the Great Barrier Reef.

  • In Bangladesh, the continuation of several protests against the Rampal coal-fired power plant that would devastate the Sundarbans region and more than 500,000 people.

  • In Chile, people’s solidarity against mega mining and the gigantic mega-dam HidroAysen project, to save Patagonia.

  • In Kenya, communities and organizations advocate for solar and against the proposed coal fired power plant in Lamu.

  • In Myanmar, villagers of Andin organize against coal to protect their livelihoods.

  • In Thailand, local people organize a hunger strike and several actions against coal.

  • In the U.S., grassroots organizing has led to the shutdown of more than 200 coal-fired power plants.

These communities are proving that all the wealth and power of the coal industry is still not enough to silence the dedicated people who are standing up for their right to breathe clean air, drink clean water and live on safe land. They will not give up and every year more people from around the world join in the fight. If anything has become clear, it’s that the growing resistance to dirty energy is demanding—and succeeding—in protecting their air, water, health and way of life from the rampant.

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

No to Coal Exports in Oakland

Lifting Crude Oil Export Ban Locks in Fossil Fuel Dependency for Decades to Come

Busted: Academics-for-Hire Exposed for Failing to Disclose Fossil Fuel Funding

Hillary Clinton Opposes Offshore Drilling, Vows to Look Into Fossil Fuel Industry Donations

Eating lots of fruits and vegetables will boost the immune system. Stevens Fremont / The Image Bank / Getty Images

By Grayson Jaggers

The connection between the pandemic and our dietary habits is undeniable. The stress of isolation coupled with a struggling economy has caused many of us to seek comfort with our old friends: Big Mac, Tom Collins, Ben and Jerry. But overindulging in this kind of food and drink might not just be affecting your waistline, but could potentially put you at greater risk of illness by hindering your immune system.

Read More Show Less

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

A graphic shows how Rhoel Dinglasan's smartphone-based saliva test works. University of Florida

As the world continues to navigate the line between reopening and maintaining safety protocols to slow the spread of the coronavirus, rapid and accurate diagnostic screening remains critical to control the outbreak. New mobile-phone-based, self-administered COVID-19 tests being developed independently around the world could be a key breakthrough in making testing more widely available, especially in developing nations.

Read More Show Less

Trending

A meteorologist monitors weather in NOAA's Center for Weather and Climate Prediction on July 2, 2013 in Riverdale, Maryland. Mark Wilson / Getty Images

The Trump White House is now set to appoint two climate deniers to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) in one month.

Read More Show Less
A plastic bag caught in a tree in New Jersey's Palisades Park. James Leynse / Stone / Getty Images

New Jersey is one step closer to passing what environmental advocates say is the strongest anti-plastic legislation in the nation.

Read More Show Less

Did you know that nearly 30% of adults do, or will, suffer from a sleep condition at some point in their life? Anyone who has experienced disruptions in their sleep is familiar with the havoc that it can wreak on your body and mind. Lack of sleep, for one, can lead to anxiety and lethargy in the short-term. In the long-term, sleep deprivation can lead to obesity, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease.

Fortunately, there are proven natural supplements that can reduce insomnia and improve quality sleep for the better. CBD oil, in particular, has been scientifically proven to promote relaxing and fulfilling sleep. Best of all, CBD is non-addictive, widely available, and affordable for just about everyone to enjoy. For these very reasons, we have put together a comprehensive guide on the best CBD oil for sleep. Our goal is to provide objective, transparent information about CBD products so you are an informed buyer.

Read More Show Less

Support Ecowatch