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20 Most Read Posts of the Year

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From Noam Chomsky's epic post on his fears of the coming Trump Administration to Michael Moore's damnation of the Flint water crisis to Robert F. Kennedy, Jr.'s first-hand account of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe's fight against the Dakota Access Pipeline, 2016 was jam-packed with news once again showing our continued disregard for the health of people and the planet.


Though there were many positive news stories last year of people, companies and governments making strides to adopt sustainable practice and transition to renewable energy sources, the world's top scientists still fear the worse as atmospheric CO2 concentrations are just above 400 parts per million, taking us closer to the "danger zone" of 2 degrees celsius increase in temperature relative to pre-industrial time.

Many people think we have already reached the tipping point, but I believe power of people can turn this around. So, here's to a 2017 where millions more people become engaged on the most important environmental issues impacting the future of our planet.

Please read and share our content to get more people involved. You can like us on Facebook, follow us on Twitter and sign up to receive our Most Read News of the Day.

Here are EcoWatch's 20 most read posts of 2016:

1. Noam Chomsky: 'The Republican Party Has Become the Most Dangerous Organization in World History'

2. World's Largest Solar Project Would Generate Electricity 24 Hours a Day, Power 1 Million U.S. Homes

3. Solar Impulse Pilot: 'I Flew Over Plastic Waste As Big As a Continent'

4. Lake Powell: Going, Going, Gone?

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EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

By Gretchen Goldman

The Independent Particulate Matter Review Panel has released their consensus recommendations to the EPA administrator on the National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Particulate Matter. The group of 20 independent experts, that were disbanded by Administrator Wheeler last October and reconvened last week, hosted by the Union of Concerned Scientists, has now made clear that the current particulate pollution standards don't protect public health and welfare.

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An African elephant is pictured on November 19, 2012, in Hwange National Park in Zimbabwe. MARTIN BUREAU / AFP / Getty Images

The unprecedented drought that has caused a water crisis in Zimbabwe has now claimed the life of at least 55 elephants since September, according to a wildlife spokesman, as CNN reported.

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Maria Dornelas.

By John C. Cannon

Life is reshuffling itself at an unsettling clip across Earth's surface and in its oceans, a new study has found.

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An Exxon station in Florida remains open despite losing its roof during Hurricane Katrina on Aug. 29, 2005. Florida Air National Guard photo by Master Sgt. Shaun Withers

The country's largest fossil fuel company goes on trial today to face charges that it lied to investors about the safety of its assets in the face of the climate crisis and potential legislation to fight it, as the AP reported.

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El Niño's effect on Antarctica is seen in a tabular iceberg off of Thwaites ice shelf. Jeremy Harbeck / NASA

El Niños are getting stronger due to climate change, according to a new study in Monday's Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

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By Julia Ries

  • Antibiotic resistance has doubled in the last 20 years.
  • Additionally a new study found one patient developed resistance to a last resort antibiotic in a matter of weeks.
  • Health experts say antibiotic prescriptions should only be given when absolutely necessary in order to avoid growing resistance.

Over the past decade, antibiotic resistance has emerged as one of the greatest public health threats.

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Pexels


There are hundreds of millions of acres of public land in the U.S., but not everyone has had the chance to hike in a national forest or picnic in a state park.

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Workers attend to a rooftop solar panel project on May 14, 2017 in Wuhan, China. Kevin Frayer / Getty Images

By Simon Evans

Renewable sources of electricity are set for rapid growth over the next five years, which could see them match the output of the world's coal-fired power stations for the first time ever.

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