Quantcast

Mosquito-Borne 'Disease Danger Days' Rise Across U.S.

Health + Wellness
John Tann / CC BY 2.0

The number of days each year when mosquito-borne illnesses are more likely to spread is rising as average temperatures soar across the U.S., according to a new analysis.

Climate Central examined 244 cities across the country for its analysis, finding that 94 percent are experiencing more "disease danger days"—days with temperatures between 61 degrees and 93 degrees F, optimal conditions for transmission of diseases like West Nile and other vector-borne diseases—than they were in 1970.


Climate Central and the El Paso Times examined the impact of rising temperatures in El Paso, which saw one of the largest rises in disease danger days and has grappled with more than 100 cases of West Nile since 2000. Fourteen cases were diagnosed last year alone, the El Paso Times reports, and health officials just confirmed this summer's first case last week.

As reported by the El Paso Times:

Department of Public Health Lead Epidemiologist Fernando Gonzalez said the mosquito season started later than usual this year.
"We know we have mosquitoes infected with West Nile virus around El Paso and need to make sure we stay vigilant about protecting ourselves from getting bitten," Gonzalez said in a news release.
There were 14 human cases of West Nile confirmed in El Paso last year, officials said. The most recent deaths associated with the virus in El Paso were two cases in 2015.

For a deeper dive:

Climate Central, El Paso Times

For more climate change and clean energy news, you can follow Climate Nexus on Twitter and Facebook, and sign up for daily Hot News.

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Elva Etienne / Moment / Getty Images

By Ketura Persellin

Gift-giving is filled with minefields, but the Environmental Working Group's (EWG) got your back, so you don't need to worry about inadvertently giving family members presents laden with toxic chemicals. With that in mind, here are our suggestions for gifts to give your family this season.

Read More Show Less
Pexels

By Cheri Bantilan MS, RD, CD

Garlic is an ingredient that provides great flavor to dishes and can be found in most kitchens across the globe.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
Pexels

By Claire O'Connor

Agriculture is on the front lines of climate change. Whether it's the a seven-year drought drying up fields in California, the devastating Midwest flooding in 2019, or hurricane after hurricane hitting the Eastern Shore, agriculture and rural communities are already feeling the effects of a changing climate. Scientists expect climate change to make these extreme weather events both more frequent and more intense in coming years.

Read More Show Less
Pexels

By Rachael Link, MS, RD

Echinacea is a group of flowering plants that belong to the daisy family, along with plants like sunflowers, chicory, chamomile, and chrysanthemums.

Read More Show Less
One of the 25 new Long Beach Transit hybrid gasoline-electric buses on April 23, 2009. Jeff Gritchen / Digital First Media / Orange County Register / Getty Images

In Long Beach, California, some electric buses can charge along their route without cords or wires.

When a bus reaches the Pine Avenue station, it parks over a special charging pad. While passengers get on and off, the charger transfers energy to a receiver on the bottom of the bus.

Read More Show Less