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More than 300,000 Oppose the 'Monsanto Protection Act'

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More than 300,000 Oppose the 'Monsanto Protection Act'

Food Democracy Now!

The grassroots community, including Food Democracy Now! and its 300,000 members, have taken aim at the House of Representatives to put a stop to the Farmers Assurance Provision that was added to the House Agricultural Appropriations bill.

The provision strips the rights of federal courts to halt the sale and planting of genetically engineered crops during the legal appeals process. It allows for biotech companies to continue to sell their unapproved seeds to farmers, who could plant them while important legal appeals are taking place, instead of halting the planting of the unapproved crop until the court settled the appeal as has been done up until now.

Food Democracy Now! is more appropriately referring to this provision as the "Monsanto Protection Act" as the biotech industry has cleverly hidden their toxic plan under the deceptive Farmers Assurance Provision  title.

If allowed to pass, the Monsanto Protection Act would:

  • Violate the constitutional precedent of separation of powers by interfering with the process of judicial review.
  • Eliminate federal agency oversight to protect farmers, consumers and the environment from potential harms caused by unapproved biotech crops.
  • Allow Monsanto and biotech seed and chemical companies to profit by overriding the rule of law and plant their untested genetically modified crops despite no proof of their safety for the public and environment.

Congressman Peter DeFazio (OR-D) will introduce an amendment this week that will strike the Farmer Assurance Provision currently included in the Agriculture Appropriations bill, and Democracy Now! is urging people to show their support of the DeFazio amendment to strike the Farmer Assurance Provision currently included in the FY 2013 Agriculture Appropriations bill.

 “If allowed to pass, the Monsanto Protection Act will only open farmers and the agricultural economy to very real and significant harm from cross-contamination events like the StarLink corn incident,” said Dave Murphy, Founder and Executive Director of Food Democracy Now!. “The new provision set forth in the FY 2013 House Agricultural Appropriations Bill will allow biotech seed and chemical companies to openly skirt even minimal protections of human health and environmental concerns. It’s time that our elected officials start putting our rights over profits for Monsanto and the biotech companies.”

Take Action Here: Join Food Democracy Now! and our allies to help stop the Monsanto Protection Act.

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 Visit EcoWatch's FARM BILL and GENETICALLY MODIFIED ORGANISM pages for more related news on this topic.

 

 

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