Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Help Support EcoWatch

Monsanto and Friends Pretend to Care, Launch 'GMO Answers' Website

GMO
Monsanto and Friends Pretend to Care, Launch 'GMO Answers' Website

Center for Food Safety

Andrew Kimbrell, executive director at Center for Food Safety, today responded to a new public relations blitz from the agrichemical industry. The promotional campaign includes a one-sided, new website sponsored by Dow, Monsanto, Syngenta, Bayer, DuPont and the Council for Biotechnology Information. 

Earlier this year, Center for Food Safety published the report, Best Public Relations Money Can Buy: A Guide to Food Industry Front Groups, revealing how chemical and other corporations hide behind benign-sounding “organizations” and use these groups to tout misleading information about chemicals and new food technologies.

“Polls consistently show that consumers don’t want products tainted with poisons and they don’t want genetically modified foods. Instead of responding to legitimate consumer concerns about the safety of these products, the industry has created a charade of transparency on their new website, innocuously named ‘GMO Answers,’ said Kimbrell. “A staunchly biotech industry funded website, it masks any real transparency on the issue of genetic engineering while attempting to pacify information-hungry consumers."

“Whenever their products are scrutinized and called into question, the agrichemical industry consistently turns to bigger and better PR rather than addressing the real issues at hand. The American people won’t be fooled by a website or a PR campaign,” said Kimbrell.

A recent poll by the New York Times showed a staggering 93 percent of respondents favoring mandatory labeling of genetically engineered (GE) foods. Twenty-six states across the nation are currently considering legislation that would require labeling of GE foods.

Visit EcoWatch’s GE FOODS page for more related news on this topic.

——–

A "trash tsunami" has washed ashore on the beaches of Honduras, endangering both wildlife and the local economy.

Read More Show Less

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Long-finned pilot whales are seen during a 1998 stranding in Marion Bay in Tasmania, Australia. Auscape / Universal Images Group / Getty Images

More long-finned pilot whales were found stranded today on beaches in Tasmania, Australia. About 500 whales have become stranded, including at least 380 that have died, the AP reported. It is the largest mass stranding in Australia's recorded history.

Read More Show Less

Trending

A protest in solidarity with the Wetʼsuwetʼen's anti-pipeline struggle, at Canada House in Trafalgar Square on March 1, 2020 in London, England. More than 200 environmental groups had their Facebook accounts suspended days before an online solidarity protest. Ollie Millington / Getty Images

Facebook suspended more than 200 accounts belonging to environmental and Indigenous groups Saturday, casting doubt on the company's stated commitments to addressing the climate crisis.

Read More Show Less
The Västra Hamnen neighborhood in Malmö, Sweden, runs on renewable energy. Tomas Ottosson / Wikimedia Commons / CC by 3.0

By Harry Kretchmer

By 2030, almost a third of all the energy consumed in the European Union must come from renewable sources, according to binding targets agreed in 2018. Sweden is helping lead the way.

Read More Show Less
An Extinction Rebellion protester outside the Bank of England on Oct. 14, 2019 in London, England. John Keeble / Getty Images

By Jessica Corbett

In another win for climate campaigners, leaders of 12 major cities around the world — collectively home to about 36 million people — committed Tuesday to divesting from fossil fuel companies and investing in a green, just recovery from the ongoing coronavirus pandemic.

Read More Show Less

Support Ecowatch