Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Miracle Backyard Digester Reduces Food Waste by 90%

Food
Miracle Backyard Digester Reduces Food Waste by 90%

The 27-inch tall solar-powered Green Cone will revolutionize how you deal with food waste in your house.

The Green Cone composter/digester by Compostec is made of 100 percent recycled plastic and has just three simple parts: a basket that can be buried underground; a black cone-shaped top; and a green cone-shaped top that fits over the black cone. The basket can be planted in the ground with the cone sitting on the surface, as TreeHugger explained.

The cone's double-walls heat up in the sun helping oxygen to circulate between the cone chamber and the basket underground. The kitchen waste is broken down through aerobic processes. No stirring is required, according to Compostec.

Bacteria, bugs, worms and other organisms living in your soil break down the waste in the basket. Ninety percent of the waste placed in the cone will be composted and enter the soil. The Green Cone only needs maintenance once a year to be emptied of small residue and cleaned, People Powered Machines reported.

It can breakdown almost all of your kitchen food waste, including meat, bones, dairy, oil, pet waste and seafood scraps.

Here's an extended list of what you can and can't feed your green cone:

Photo credit: Compostec

The Green Cone can digest roughly 1 kilogram (2 pounds) of waste every two days in the summer—a total of 4 kilograms (10 pounds) each week.

The exterior is squirrel- and raccoon-proof and bear and rat resistant, according to Compostec.

Using the Green Cone reduces the total amount of kitchen waste you produce by 20 percent. It also keeps waste out of landfills and makes your garbage lighter, drier and better smelling.

Photo credit: Compostec

If you don't have a place to plant the cone, it can also be used above ground on parking lots, apartment balconies and even roofs, Compostec said.

The Green Cone can be bought for $210. Compostec also offers programs with cities and municipalities that subsidize the cone to promote the practice of composting.

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE:

Nation's First Urban Farming School Teaches Kids to Grow and Cook Their Own Food

EU Fails to Approve 'Technical Extension' for Weed-Killer Glyphosate

6 Questions for Monsanto

31 Incredible Ways to Use Coconut Oil

Marilyn Angel Wynn / Getty Images

By Christina Gish Hill

Historians know that turkey and corn were part of the first Thanksgiving, when Wampanoag peoples shared a harvest meal with the pilgrims of Plymouth plantation in Massachusetts. And traditional Native American farming practices tell us that squash and beans likely were part of that 1621 dinner too.

Read More Show Less

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Former U.S. Sec. of Energy Ernest Moniz listens during the National Clean Energy Summit 9.0 on October 13, 2017 in Las Vegas, Nevada. Isaac Brekken / Getty Images for National Clean Energy Summit

By Jake Johnson

Amid reports that oil industry-friendly former Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz remains under consideration to return to his old post in the incoming Biden administration, a diverse coalition of environmental groups is mobilizing for an "all-out push" to keep Moniz away from the White House and demand a cabinet willing to boldly confront the corporations responsible for the climate emergency.

Read More Show Less

Trending

Climate change can evoke intense feelings, but a conversational approach can help. Reed Kaestner / Getty Images

Anger, anxiety, overwhelm … climate change can evoke intense feelings.


Read More Show Less
A rare North Atlantic right whale is seen off Cape Cod Bay on April 14, 2019 near Provincetown, Massachusetts. Don Emmert / AFP / Getty Images

An extremely rare North Atlantic right whale calf was found dead off the North Carolina coast on Friday.

Read More Show Less
Sprinklers irrigate a field of onions near a Castilian village in Spain. According to a new study, the average farm size in the EU has almost doubled since the 1960s. miguelangelortega / Moment / Getty Images

By Andrea Germanos

A new report released Tuesday details the "shocking" state of global land equality, saying the problem is worse than thought, rising, and "cannot be ignored."

Read More Show Less