Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Help Support EcoWatch

Millions to ‘March Against Monsanto' on May 24

Food
Millions to ‘March Against Monsanto' on May 24

Regardless where you live, May 24 marks the annual opportunity to March Against Monsanto.

The event protesting the GMO (genetically modified organisms) giant will simultaneously take place in more than 400 cities in 52 countries that span six continents. That's up from 286 cities in 36 countries last year. Among the marches is one in St. Louis, MO, which is home to Monsanto's headquarters.

Click here for a full list of March Against Monsanto events.

The March Against Monsanto will take place in about 150 more cities than last year. Photo credit: Becker1999/Flickr Creative Commons

"Historically, Monsanto has brought us DDT [(dichloro-diphenyl-trichloroethane], PCBs [polychlorinated biphenyl], Agent Orange and dioxin," reads a Facebook invitation to the St. Louis march. "Monsanto’s reckless use of chemicals calls into question their testing standards, lack of scientific rigor, disregard for the precautionary principle and disregard for human life and the ecosystem.

"Currently, we’re faced with Monsanto’s seed patenting and subsequent extortion in demanding pay for seeds from future crops, the proliferation of genetically modified foods (GMOs), use of dangerous pesticides, and their efforts to control the food supply. Monsanto leaves damaged farms, people, animals and entire ecosystems in their wake."

The event aims to highlight the various modes of distress Monsanto has created for people around the planet. For example, more than 250,000 impoverished farmers in India have committed suicide as a result of Monsanto's Bt cotton seeds not performing as anticipated. Sterility, infant mortality, birth defects and increased cancer risks are among the health risks associated with Monsanto chemicals and seeds.

"We will not allow this ‘Garden of Eden' to be compromised by the destructive practices of multinational corporations like Monsanto," Josh Castro, organizer for Quito, Ecuador’s march, said in a statement for the global march. "Biotechnology is not the solution to world hunger. Agroecology is. Monsanto's harmful practices are causing soil infertility, mono-cropping, loss of biodiversity, habitat destruction and contributing to beehive collapse. GMO crops cross pollenate with traditional crops, risking peasant farmers' livelihood."

Local March Against Monsanto events will take place in 47 of 50 states in the U.S.

“Monsanto’s predatory business and corporate agricultural practices threatens their generation’s health, fertility and longevity," said Tami Monroe Canal, the founder of March Against Monsanto who began the event to protect her children from GMOs. "MAM supports a sustainable food production system.

"We must act now to stop GMOs and harmful pesticides.”

——–

YOU ALSO MIGHT LIKE

Despite Kidney Disease Link, Sri Lanka Places Monsanto Herbicide Ban on Hold

How You Might Be Investing in Monsanto’s Toxic Legacy Without Realizing It

5 Reasons Monsanto’s ‘Science’ Doesn’t Add Up

——–

Coast Guard members work to clean an oil spill impacting Delaware beaches. U.S. Coast Guard District 5

Environmental officials and members of the U.S. Coast Guard are racing to clean up a mysterious oil spill that has spread to 11 miles of Delaware coastline.

Read More Show Less

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

What happened to all that plastic you've put in the recycling bin over the years? Halfpoint / Getty Images

By Dr. Kate Raynes-Goldie

Of all the plastic we've ever produced, only 9% has been recycled. So what happened to all that plastic you've put in the recycling bin over the years?

Read More Show Less

Trending

Plain Naturals offers a wide variety of CBD products including oils, creams and gummies.

Plain Naturals is making waves in the CBD space with a new product line for retail customers looking for high potency CBD products at industry-low prices.

Read More Show Less
Donald Trump and Joe Biden arrive onstage for the final presidential debate at Belmont University in Nashville, Tennessee, on Oct. 22, 2020. JIM WATSON / AFP via Getty Images

Towards the end of the final presidential debate of the 2020 election season, the moderator asked both candidates how they would address both the climate crisis and job growth, leading to a nearly 12-minute discussion where Donald Trump did not acknowledge that the climate is changing and Joe Biden called the climate crisis an existential threat.

Read More Show Less
What will happen to all these batteries once they wear out? Ronny Hartmann / AFP / Getty Images

By Zheng Chen and Darren H. S. Tan

As concern mounts over the impacts of climate change, many experts are calling for greater use of electricity as a substitute for fossil fuels. Powered by advancements in battery technology, the number of plug-in hybrid and electric vehicles on U.S. roads is increasing. And utilities are generating a growing share of their power from renewable fuels, supported by large-scale battery storage systems.

Read More Show Less

Support Ecowatch