Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Millennials Ditch Trump Over His Stance on Climate Change

Popular
Millennials Ditch Trump Over His Stance on Climate Change

Voters across the political and demographic spectrum find Trump increasingly objectionable and Millennials in particular are refusing to support the Republican nominee because of his position on climate change. While a USA Today / Rock the Vote poll just released shows that Clinton is "trouncing Trump 56 percent - 20 percent among those under 35," a Washington Post analysis of the reasons why former supporters are abandoning Trump shows that the issue of climate change plays prominently with millennials.

In a piece over the weekend, Former supporters describe their 'last straw' when it came to Trump, the Post took a look at Millennial reddit users and found trends represented by examples like the following:

"I was on the fence until he said global warming was a hoax," WubbaLubbaDubStep said.

"When he and Clinton both got the nomination for their respective parties, I was actually leaning more toward Trump," Scratch_That_Itch said. "However, his denial of climate change completely changed my mind. I'm not one to get caught up in the doom and gloom of many articles about the climate changing, but there is absolutely ZERO reason not to invest time, money and energy into renewable/cleaner power sources."

Trump doubled down on his absurd position Friday, telling the Miami Herald that he's "not a big believer in manmade climate change."

If elected, Trump would be in the ridiculous international position of being the only world leader of any nation to deny climate science and the dangers posed by the climate crisis. Just as he is alienating voters of every age and demographic due to his total ignorance on climate, he would alienate world leaders from every country, harming our alliances and relationships around the world and making America weaker.

In contrast, Secretary Hillary Clinton has proven she is a climate champion with the track record and experience to work with our allies and move climate action forward on a global scale. She wants to end the debate once and for all surrounding offshore drilling in the Arctic and the Atlantic oceans and she is pushing for much-needed reform of the antiquated, Nixon-era rules governing coal mining on public lands. She is committed to protecting our forests and public lands, while also doubling the American outdoor economy, which creates jobs and generates billions of dollars.

Millennials want a president who holds justice and equality among their top priorities. Clinton has demonstrated her commitment to progressive values time and again, from her work as an advocate at the Children's Defense Fund, to making history by holding the first hearing on environmental justice ever in the U.S. Senate.

While Trump will drag us backwards toward the dirty fuels of the past and cook the planet in the process, Clinton will build on the progress we've already achieved in moving America and the world, towards a 21st century clean energy economy under President Obama.

Plastic bails, left, and aluminum bails, right, are photographed at the Green Waste material recovery facility on Thursday, March 28, 2019, in San Jose, California. Aric Crabb / Digital First Media / Bay Area News via Getty Images

By Courtney Lindwall

Coined in the 1970s, the classic Earth Day mantra "Reduce, Reuse, Recycle" has encouraged consumers to take stock of the materials they buy, use, and often quickly pitch — all in the name of curbing pollution and saving the earth's resources. Most of us listened, or lord knows we tried. We've carried totes and refused straws and dutifully rinsed yogurt cartons before placing them in the appropriately marked bins. And yet, nearly half a century later, the United States still produces more than 35 million tons of plastic annually, and sends more and more of it into our oceans, lakes, soils, and bodies.

Read More Show Less
EcoWatch Daily Newsletter
Rise and Resist activist group marched together to demand climate and racial justice. Steve Sanchez / Pacific Press / LightRocket / Getty Images

By Alexandria Villaseñor

This story is part of Covering Climate Now, a global journalism collaboration strengthening coverage of the climate story.

My journey to becoming an activist began in late 2018. During a trip to California to visit family, the Camp Fire broke out. At the time, it was the most devastating and destructive wildfire in California history. Thousands of acres and structures burned, and many lives were lost. Since then, California's wildfires have accelerated: This past year, we saw the first-ever "gigafire," and by the end of 2020, more than four million acres had burned.

Read More Show Less
Trending
U.S. Interior Secretary Deb Haaland announced a pair of climate-related secretarial orders on Friday, April 16. U.S. Department of the Interior

By Jessica Corbett

As the Biden administration reviews the U.S. government's federal fossil fuels program and faces pressure to block any new dirty energy development, Interior Secretary Deb Haaland won praise from environmentalists on Friday for issuing a pair of climate-related secretarial orders.

Read More Show Less
David Attenborough narrates "The Year Earth Changed," premiering globally April 16 on Apple TV+. Apple

Next week marks the second Earth Day of the coronavirus pandemic. While a year of lockdowns and travel restrictions has limited our ability to explore the natural world and gather with others for its defense, it is still possible to experience the wonder and inspiration from the safety of your home.

Read More Show Less

By Michael Svoboda

For April's bookshelf we take a cue from Earth Day and step back to look at the bigger picture. It wasn't climate change that motivated people to attend the teach-ins and protests that marked that first observance in 1970; it was pollution, the destruction of wild lands and habitats, and the consequent deaths of species.

Read More Show Less