Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Help Support EcoWatch

Michael Pollan: Return to the Kitchen to Forge a Deeper Connection to the Ingredients We Use to Nourish Ourselves

Food
Michael Pollan: Return to the Kitchen to Forge a Deeper Connection to the Ingredients We Use to Nourish Ourselves

By Willy Blackmore

Going back to when he was better known for books about gardening than for being a food writer, author Michael Pollan has been able to show the bridge between the culture of a plant and the politics of it. Whether writing about the American lawn, Ireland's potato famine, tulip mania in the Netherlands or more recently, monoculture farming and GMO crops, Pollan makes a compelling case that our relationships with what we grow and eat are both political and important.

For his latest project, Cooked, a four-part documentary series made with filmmaker Alex Gibney, Pollan is looking past his edict of what to eat—“Eat food, not too much, mostly plants"—and taking a deep look into how that food is prepared. In a new trailer for the series, which will be available for streaming on Netflix on Feb. 19, Pollan says, “The meal is this incredible human institution—when we learned to cook is when we became truly human. But we've lost touch, I think, with how that food gets to our plate."

Each of the four episodes focuses on an element—fire, water, air and Earth—as it relates to cooking. Pollan delves into Southern barbecue and other traditions of meat cooked over wood for fire, while old-school sourdough bread—and the old-school wheat farming that underpins it—is considered in the air portion of the series. It is part travelogue, part food porn, all built around the central thesis of this and nearly all of Pollan's work: Cooking is a profound political act.

This article was reposted with permission from our media associate TakePart.

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

The Super Bowl Doritos Commercial You Didn't Get to See

5 Non-Stick Pans That Won't Give You Cancer

The Truth About Gluten: Is it Healthy for Me?

Neil Young Takes His Anti-Monsanto Message on the Road

Columbia Basin pygmy rabbits. Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife

The wildfires that roared through Eastern Washington in September had a devastating impact on an extremely endangered species of rabbit.

Read More Show Less

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

A protestor in NYC holds up a sign that reads, "November Is Coming" on June 14, 2020 in reference to voting in the 2020 presidential election. Ira L. Black / Corbis / Getty Images

By Mark Hertsgaard

What follows are not candidate endorsements. Rather, this nonpartisan guide aims to inform voters' choices, help journalists decide what races to follow, and explore what the 2020 elections could portend for climate action in the United States in 2021 and beyond.

Read More Show Less

Trending

Activists fight a peat fire in Siberia in September. ALEXANDER NEMENOV / AFP via Getty Images

The wildfires that ignited in the Arctic this year started earlier and emitted more carbon dioxide than ever before.

Read More Show Less
A metapopulation project in South Africa has almost doubled the population of cheetahs in less than nine years. Ken Blum / Wikimedia Commons / CC by 3.0

By Tony Carnie

South Africa is home to around 1,300 of the world's roughly 7,100 remaining cheetahs. It's also the only country in the world with significant cheetah population growth, thanks largely to a nongovernmental conservation project that depends on careful and intensive human management of small, fenced-in cheetah populations. Because most of the reserves are privately funded and properly fenced, the animals benefit from higher levels of security than in the increasingly thinly funded state reserves.

Read More Show Less
A new super enzyme feeds on the type of plastic that water and soda bottles are made of, polyethylene terephthalate (PET). zoff-photo / iStock / Getty Images Plus

Scientists are on the brink of scaling up an enzyme that devours plastic. In the latest breakthrough, the enzyme degraded plastic bottles six times faster than previous research achieved, as The Guardian reported.

Read More Show Less

Support Ecowatch