Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Michael Brune: To Change Everything, We Need Everyone

Climate
Michael Brune: To Change Everything, We Need Everyone

Nothing is reasonable about climate disruption. The hardship caused by rising temperatures won't be distributed fairly. In fact, many of the nations facing the worst consequences have contributed the least to the problem. Despite that inequity, though, global climate change remains an inherently shared problem for all humanity. The people of the Earth must solve it together.

That's why international climate negotiations matter, in spite of their mixed record of progress. Later this year, Paris will host the 21st session of the Conference of the Parties to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC)—COP21, for short. Leaders from 195 countries will attempt to agree on how to combat climate.

When the whole world comes together, we can save the beautiful, life-giving, amazing planet we call home. Photo credit: Sierra Club

The good news is that we've never had better reason to hope for progress internationally. The U.S. will arrive with its strongest-ever commitment to reducing greenhouse gas emissions, with a proven record of success over the past decade, and with a Clean Power Plan from the EPA that can get us all the way to a 30 percent reduction in emissions and beyond. We're not alone, either. Major players from Europe to Asia are making serious commitments to reduce their use of dirty fuels and to promote clean energy.

People around the world want clean power and a safer climate future and we will keep working toward those goals regardless of whether our governments manage to reach a meaningful international agreement. But it will be a lot easier for us to succeed if Paris is a success.

As people who care about the climate, how can each of us help achieve a strong outcome in Paris? By building momentum from the grassroots up:

  • Speak out about COP21—talk to your friends, your family, your coworkers and your neighbors to let them know what's happening.
  • Share, tweet and post about this historic moment in the climate movement (#ActInParis).
  • Check out our #ActInParis campaign, where you can join our photo petition, get involved with our Local-to-Global campaign, sign up for the National Day of Action on Oct. 14 and let President Obama know that you support strong climate action in Paris.

To change everything, we need everyone. When the whole world comes together, we can save the beautiful, life-giving, amazing planet we call home.

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

8 Reasons to Be Hopeful About Our Climate Future

Bonn Climate Talks Fail to Deliver Common Grounds Undermining Hopes of Meaningful Deal in Paris

Call for a Future Powered by 100% Renewables Gains Momentum as UN Climate Talks Resume in Bonn

Lakota spiritual leader Chief Arvol Looking Horse attends a demonstration against the proposed Keystone XL pipeline from Canada to the Gulf of Mexico in front of the White House in Washington, DC, on January 28, 2015. Nicholas Kamm / AFP / Getty Images

President-elect Joe Biden is planning to cancel the controversial Keystone XL pipeline on the first day of his administration, a document reported by CBC on Sunday suggests.

Read More Show Less

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

A plume of smoke from wildfires burning in the Angeles National Forest is seen from downtown Los Angeles on Aug. 29, 2009 in Los Angeles, California. Kevork Djansezian / Getty Images

California is bracing for rare January wildfires this week amid damaging Santa Ana winds coupled with unusually hot and dry winter weather.

Read More Show Less

Trending

A new study invites parents of cancer patients to answer questions about their environment. FatCamera / Getty Images

By Jennifer Sass, Nsedu Obot Witherspoon, Dr. Philip J. Landrigan and Simon Strong

"Prevention is the cure for child/teen cancer." This is the welcoming statement on a website called 'TheReasonsWhy.Us', where families affected by childhood cancers can sign up for a landmark new study into the potential environmental causes.

Read More Show Less
Madagascar has been experiencing ongoing droughts and food insecurity since 2016. arturbo / Getty Images

Nearly 1.6 million people in the southern part of Madagascar have faced food insecurity since 2016, experiencing one drought after another, the United Nations World Food Program reported.

Read More Show Less
German Chancellor Angela Merkel and German ESA astronaut Alexander Gerst stand at the Orion spacecraft during a visit at the training unit of the Columbus space laboratory at the European Astronaut training centre of the European Space Agency ESA in Cologne, Germany on May 18, 2016. Ina Fassbender / Anadolu Agency / Getty Images

By Monir Ghaedi

As the COVID-19 pandemic continues to keep most of Europe on pause, the EU aims for a breakthrough in its space program. The continent is seeking more than just a self-sufficient space industry competitive with China and the U.S.; the industry must also fit into the European Green Deal.

Read More Show Less