Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Michael Bloomberg Considers a Run for President

Politics
Michael Bloomberg Considers a Run for President

Billionaire and former New York City mayor Michael Bloomberg told his advisers to draw up plans for a potential independent campaign in this year’s presidential race.

Bloomberg, founder of Bloomberg LP and Bloomberg Philanthropies, was "galled" by Donald Trump's dominance of the GOP race and "troubled by Hillary Clinton's stumbles and the rise of Sen. Bernie Sanders of Vermont on the Democratic side," The New York Times reported.

Bloomberg has considered presidential runs in the past, but he is yet again revisiting the idea, telling friends and colleagues he would be willing to spend $1 billion of his personal fortune on the race. He has set a March deadline for deciding whether to enter the race. If he decides to run, it would certainly shake up the presidential race.

The New York Times said:

Mr. Bloomberg would face daunting and perhaps insurmountable obstacles in a presidential campaign: No independent candidate has ever been elected to the White House, and Mr. Bloomberg’s close Wall Street ties and liberal social views, including his strong support for abortion rights and gun control, could repel voters on the left and right.

But his possible candidacy also underscores the volatility of a presidential race that could be thrown into further turmoil by a wild-card candidate like Mr. Bloomberg.

If Republicans were to nominate Mr. Trump or Senator Ted Cruz of Texas, a hard-line conservative, and Democrats chose Mr. Sanders, Mr. Bloomberg — who changed his party affiliation to independent in 2007—has told allies he would be likely to run.

While mayor of New York City, he took aggressive steps to help the city mitigate and adapt to climate change. And through his charity, he has donated millions of dollars to environmental causes. He now serves as the UN’s Special Envoy for Cities and Climate Change. Though he may seem like a strong candidate for environmentalists, at least some in the environmental community are not pleased that he is considering a presidential bid.

If he runs, wrote Ben Adler of Grist, "he will destroy his own legacy and irreparably damage the causes he supposedly cares most about, such as gun control and fighting climate change."

Adler argued that Bloomberg cannot win as a third-party candidate and will only take away votes from the Democratic candidate. "Simply put, like every third-party candidate who has run in an American winner-take-all presidential election, Bloomberg would have no chance of winning and would only play a spoiler role by taking more votes from the major party candidate to whom he is most similar," Adler said. "That would be the Democratic candidate."

For more on Bloomberg's possible presidential bid and how he made his billions, listen to this Marketplace segment:

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

NYC’s Biggest Pension Fund Lost $135 Million From Oil and Gas Holdings

Matt Damon Slams Michigan Governor Over Flint Water Crisis: ‘At the Very Least He Should Resign!’

Canada’s Trudeau to DiCaprio: Tone Down ‘Inflammatory Rhetoric’ on Climate Change

5 Reasons Ted Cruz Is More Dangerous Than Donald Trump

Recycling and general waste plastic wheelie bins awaiting collection for disposal in Newport, Rhode Island. Tim Graham / Getty Images

Reduce. Reuse. Recycle. According to The National Museum of American History, this popular slogan, with its iconic three arrows forming a triangle, embodied a national call to action to save the environment in the 1970s. In that same decade, the first Earth Day happened, the EPA was formed and Congress passed the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, encouraging recycling and conservation of resources, Enviro Inc. reported.

Read More Show Less
EcoWatch Daily Newsletter
The coal-fired Huaneng Power Plant in Huai 'an City, Jiangsu Province, China on Sept. 13, 2020. Costfoto / Barcroft Media via Getty Images

One of the silver linings of the coronavirus pandemic was the record drop in greenhouse gas emissions following national lockdowns. But that drop is set to all but reverse as economies begin to recover, the International Energy Agency (IEA) warned Tuesday.

Read More Show Less
Trending
A grizzly bear killed an outdoor guide in a rare attack near Yellowstone Park. William Campbell / Corbis / Getty Images

A backcountry guide has died after being mauled by a grizzly bear near Yellowstone National Park.

Read More Show Less
Representative Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-NY) re-introduces the Green New Deal in Washington, D.C. on April 20, 2021. Mandel Ngan / AFP / Getty Images

By Brett Wilkins

In the latest of a flurry of proposed Green New Deal legislation, Reps. Cori Bush and Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez on Monday introduced the Green New Deal for Cities Act of 2021, a $1 trillion plan to "tackle the environmental injustices that are making us and our children sick, costing us our homes, and destroying our planet."

Read More Show Less
Offshore oil and gas drillers have left more than 18,000 miles of pipelines at the bottom of the Gulf of Mexico. Drew Angerer / Getty Images

Offshore oil and gas drillers have discarded and abandoned more than 18,000 miles of pipelines on the floor of the Gulf of Mexico since the 1960s, a report from the Government Accountability Office says.

Read More Show Less