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'Put Up or Shut Up': North Carolina Meteorologist Calls Out Climate Deniers

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'Put Up or Shut Up': North Carolina Meteorologist Calls Out Climate Deniers

Frustrated by non-experts taking to the internet to dispute the science behind human-made climate change, North Carolina meteorologist Greg Fishel issued a challenge to climate deniers, urging them to "put up or shut up" and "submit your work the way real scientists do, and see where it takes you."


The News & Observer highlighted Fishel's challenge, which he posted on Facebook, in a May 22 article, reporting that Fishel "went off on people who question the science behind climate change."

The article noted that for most of his career, Fishel, who is the chief meteorologist for NBC affiliate WRAL in Raleigh, did not believe that humans contributed significantly to global warming. "But several years ago, he says he decided he wasn't being open-minded about the issue and began to study what climate scientists were saying about it. He now approaches the issue on the air and on social media with the zeal of a convert."

Indeed, Fishel is among a growing number of meteorologists who acknowledge that human-caused climate change is real. Some of those meteorologists are urging their colleagues to discuss climate change on the air.

Fishel concluded his post by challenging climate deniers to submit their findings to one of the American Meteorological Society's peer-reviewed journals, adding, "So prove me wrong bloggers and essayists. Submit your work the way real scientists do, and see where it takes you. Uncover that bias and corruption you're so convinced is present. If you end up being correct, society will owe you a huge debt of gratitude. If you're wrong, stop muddying the scientific waters with ideological trash."

From the The News & Observer:

For most of his 36 years broadcasting the weather in the Triangle, Fishel also held a contrarian view about climate change. He didn't believe that humans had much to do with warming the Earth's atmosphere and would say as much when the topic came up on the air.

But several years ago, he says he decided he wasn't being open-minded about the issue and began to study what climate scientists were saying about it. He now approaches the issue on the air and on social media with the zeal of a convert.

If someone does have "a critical piece to the puzzle no other scientist has," Fishel implored them to submit their findings to one of the American Meteorological Society's peer reviewed journals for publication.

"If they are rejected, and the author feels unfairly, then make public each and every one of the reviewers' comments for the entire world to see," Fishel wrote. "If there is bias and corruption in the peer review process, everyone needs to know about it so this flawed process can be halted and corrected."

But Fishel said he doubts any of the climate change deniers "has the guts to do this" and said he thinks they'll continue "with their pathetic excuse for science education.

Reposted with permission from our media associate Media Matters for America.


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