Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Help Support EcoWatch

Massive Coral Reef Discovered at Mouth of Amazon, But It’s Already Threatened by Oil Drilling

Energy
Massive Coral Reef Discovered at Mouth of Amazon, But It’s Already Threatened by Oil Drilling
Scientists recently made a surprising discovery of a 600-mile long deepwater reef system below the Amazon's muddy waters. Modis / NASA

Scientists recently made a surprising discovery of a 600-mile long deepwater reef system below the Amazon's muddy waters. More than 60 species of sponges, 73 species of fish, spiny lobsters, stars and other reef life have been found there.


This is good news for marine life, especially in the wake of massive coral bleaching around the world. However, the newly discovered reef is already in grave danger from oil exploration and drilling at the mouth of Amazon—some of it possibly right on top of the reef.

A map of the Amazon shelf showing the newly discovered reef structures in yellow. Photo credit: Carlos Rezende (UENF) and Fabiano Thompson (UFRJ)

For a deeper dive: National Geographic, Guardian, Live Science, International Business Times, Inquisitr, Christian Science Monitor, NPR, Mashable

For more climate change and clean energy news, you can follow Climate Nexus on Twitter and Facebook, and sign up for daily Hot News.

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

Shocking Migratory Changes Bring Electric Rays to Canada's Pacific

The Role of the Worm in Recycling Wastewater

Watch Racing Extinction: It Will Change the Way You View the World

Scientists Confirm: 93% of Great Barrier Reef Now Bleached

A federal judge in Washington, D.C. struck down the Trump administration's proposed changes to the SNAP benefits program. Robert Nickelsberg / Getty Images

By Julia Conley

A federal judge in Washington, D.C. late Sunday struck down the Trump administration's proposed changes to the SNAP benefits program, potentially saving hundreds of thousands of people from losing badly needed federal food assistance.

Read More Show Less

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Demonstrators hold signs at an anti-tar sands march in St. Paul, Minnesota in 2015. Fibonacci Blue / CC BY 2.0

By Andrea Germanos

A group of Indigenous women and their allies on Monday urged the heads of major global financial institutions to stop propping up the tar sands industry and sever all ties with the sector's "climate-wrecking pipelines, as well as the massively destructive extraction projects that feed them."

Read More Show Less

Trending

Poor eating habits, lack of exercise, genetics, and a bunch of other things are known to be behind excessive weight gain. But, did you know that how much sleep you get each night can also determine how much weight you gain or lose?

Read More Show Less
A flying squirrel in Florida. Despite their name, flying squirrels do not actually fly, but rather glide between trees. Danita Delimont / Gallo Images / Getty Images Plus

In January of 2019, a concerned citizen in Marion County, Florida noticed something strange: Someone was trapping flying squirrels.

Read More Show Less
New research finds baby bottles may release millions of microplastic particles with each feeding. Beeki / Needpix

The process of preparing and mixing a baby bottle formula seems innocuous, but new research finds this common occurrence is actually releasing millions of microplastic particles from the bottle's lining, Wired reported.

Read More Show Less

Support Ecowatch