Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Help Support EcoWatch

Martin Guitar Is in Tune With the Environment

Business
Martin Guitar Is in Tune With the Environment
Martin Guitar / Facebook

Martin Guitar, one of the world's top acoustic guitar manufacturers based in Nazareth, Pennsylvania, has been run by the same family for six generations, since its founding in 1833. But its long business history hasn't stopped C.F. Martin & Co from trying new things.

On Monday, Martin Guitar was recognized by the Department of Energy (DOE) for its success at rapidly improving energy efficiency, a DOE press release reported.


The company made the improvements as part of the DOE's Better Plants Challenge. Manufacturers who join the challenge as partners pledge to improve energy efficiency by 25 percent over a 10 year period. Martin Guitars managed that feet in two.

"Through the DOE's Better Plants program, manufacturers like C.F. Martin are using energy more productivity, creating jobs, and driving economic growth," principal deputy assistant secretary in the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) at DOE Daniel Simmons said in the press release.

To achieve the Better Plants goal, Martin Guitars replaced its old HVAC systems with an updated Central Hot/ Chilled Water plant.

"We had some very, very, old equipment that was inefficient," Fred Everett of Martin Guitar told WFMZ TV. "So the state of the art investment allowed us to create air conditioning, to do humidity control in our manufacturing facility for about 70 percent less kilowatts per ton."

Martin Guitar invested $8 million in the improvements, and is already seeing results. The new plant reduced natural gas consumption by 20 percent and electricity use by 46 percent, better than Martin Guitar expected, according the DOE press release. That added up to a 27 percent reduction in energy intensity overall.

While the decision was good for the planet, it has also benefited the business. Martin Guitar saved $500,000 in yearly energy costs and $150,000 in yearly maintenance costs. The new plant also improves Martin Guitar's ability to control humidity and temperature, an important boon for a guitar maker.

Martin Guitar will now be able to share its success with the nearly 200 other manufacturers participating in the Better Plants program, since information sharing is one of the program's goals: "To get that information, make sure other companies see the good work they are doing and are able to replicate it," Simmons told WFMZ TV.

In total, Better Plants partners have saved $4.2 billion in energy costs to date. The partners comprise 1,800 plants, eight percent of the U.S. manufacturing footprint, according to the Better Plants Frequently Asked Questions page. Other partners include big names like General Motors, Raytheon and PepsiCo. The DOE helps partners to achieve their energy goals by providing them with resources, tools and trainings to identify and implement energy saving opportunities.

Colette Pichon Battle, attorney, founder, and executive director of the Gulf Coast Center for Law & Policy. Colette Pichon Battle

By Karen L. Smith-Janssen

Colette Pichon Battle gave a December 2019 TEDWomen Talk on the stark realities of climate change displacement, and people took notice. The video racked up a million views in about two weeks. The attorney, founder, and executive director of the Gulf Coast Center for Law & Policy (GCCLP) advocates for climate justice in communities of color. Confronted with evidence showing how her own South Louisiana coastal home of Bayou Liberty will be lost to flooding in coming years, the 2019 Obama Fellow dedicates herself to helping others still reeling from the impacts of Katrina face the heavy toll that climate change has taken—and will take—on their lives and homelands. Her work focuses on strengthening multiracial coalitions, advocating for federal, state, and local disaster mitigation measures, and redirecting resources toward Black communities across the Gulf South.

Read More Show Less

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

A palm tree plantation in Malaysia. Yann Arthus-Bertrand / Getty Images Plus

Between 2000 and 2013, Earth lost an area of undisturbed ecosystems roughly the size of Mexico.

Read More Show Less

Trending

A home burns during the Bobcat Fire in Juniper Hills, California on September 18, 2020. Kyle Grillot / AFP/ Getty Images

By Stuart Braun

"These are not just wildfires, they are climate fires," Jay Inslee, Governor of Washington State, said as he stood amid the charred remains of the town of Malden west of Seattle earlier this month. "This is not an act of God," he added. "This has happened because we have changed the climate of the state of Washington in dramatic ways."

Read More Show Less
A new report from Oxfam found that the wealthiest one percent of the world produced a carbon footprint that was more than double that of the bottom 50 percent of the world. PickPik

A new report from Oxfam found that the wealthiest one percent of the world produced a carbon footprint that was more than double that of the bottom 50 percent of the world, The Guardian reported. The study examined 25 years of carbon dioxide emissions and wealth inequality from 1990 to 2015.

Read More Show Less
The label of one of the recalled thyroid medications. FDA

If you are taking medication for an underactive thyroid, check your prescription.

Read More Show Less

Support Ecowatch