Quantcast

March Against Monsanto This Saturday

GMO

Food & Water Watch

This Saturday, May 25, tens of thousands of activists across six continents, 41 countries and more than 330 cities are expected to March Against Monsanto. Instigated and driven completely by grassroots activists, this global day of action hopes to demonstrate that, when many people ban together for justice and transparency, they can fight back against the powerful few. The following InfoWars news alert about Monsanto’s CEO feeling threatened by grassroots efforts, particularly social media.

Food & Water Watch supports the solutions that March Against Monsanto advocates for—the need for mandatory GE food labeling, further scientific research on the health and environmental impacts of GE food and repealing the Monsanto Rider that slipped into the recent budget bill, also known as the Monsanto Protection Act.

We are calling for more transparency about the undue influence that Monsanto and other biotechnology seed corporations hold over our government and recently released a stunning report about how the U.S. State Department works to promote Monsanto and the biotech seed industry on the taxpayer’s dime.

Food & Water Watch is proud to be supporting March Against Monsanto activities in various cities across the country—New York City, NY; New Brunswick, NJ; Miami, FL; Portland, ME; Mystic, CT; Philadelphia, PA; Detroit, MI; Chicago and Springfield, IL; Des Moines and the Quad Cities, IA; Cincinnati, OH; Denver, CO; Albuquerque and Santa Fe, NM; Portland, OR; and Seattle and Ramond, WA.

Visit EcoWatch’s GE FOODS page for more related news on this topic.

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Truth in Action is a day-long global conversation on the climate crisis and how we solve it. The Climate Reality Project

Former Vice President Al Gore kicked off 24 hours of climate talks in the U.S. and 77 other countries around the world Wednesday night.

Read More Show Less
Activists highlighted the climate emergency outside Scottish Government headquarters at St Andrew's House in Edinburgh on Oct. 13, 2017. Usage of the term "climate emergency" spiked in 2019, according to Oxford Dictionaries.

By Jessica Corbett

Climate advocates and experts celebrated Oxford Dictionaries' announcement Wednesday that "climate emergency" is the Oxford Word of the Year 2019.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
Using more bamboo for building could slow climate change. kazuend / Unsplash

By Kieran Cooke

There could be a way of countering one key aspect of the climate emergency by making much greater use of a widely-available plant: bamboo building.

Read More Show Less
Fossil fueled power plant pictured before a rain. glasseyes view / Flickr / CC BY-SA 2.0

Governments are producing fossil fuels at a rate 120 percent above compliance with Paris agreement goals, a landmark report from the UN Environment Programme found.

Read More Show Less
Ten Democratic primary candidates participated in the fifth Democratic debate in Atlanta Wednesday night. Alex Wong / Getty Images

The moderators of the fifth Democratic primary debate in Atlanta Wednesday night only asked one question about the climate crisis, Grist reported Thursday.

Read More Show Less