Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Maple Syrup Farmer Concerned Climate Change Will Prevent His Kids From Continuing Family Business

Climate

By David Appell

Making maple syrup is weather-dependent and a warming trend in the Northeast is reducing syrup yields.

Six to eight weeks before mature maple trees bud in the spring, maple syrup producers collect sap and then boil it down to make syrup. The whole process relies on flowing sap and that requires temperatures that swing from below freezing nights to above freezing days.

Fadden's Maple Sugarhouse in New Hampshire has been taking advantage of this natural process for more than 100 years.

Photo credit: James Fadden

But James Fadden says the climate conditions are changing. Warming trends and earlier spring temperatures mean the syrup season now begins earlier.

Fadden: “I have records of my grandfather and my great-grandfather's operation back in the 1930s and '40s and it seemed as though they always started around the first or second week of March."

Fadden's season, however, is now starting at the end of February. He hopes his children and grandchildren will continue the family business on the land that's been in his family for generations, but he's not confident they'll have that chance.

Fadden: “Well, the forecasts that I read about is that I'm going to have the climate of Virginia, right here in New Hampshire."

And that could eventually make it too warm to produce liquid gold in the White Mountains of New Hampshire.

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

Regenerative Farming: Number One Anecdote to Climate Change

Inside Europe's Largest Urban Farm

24 Groups Leading the Charge in Cultivating Urban Farming

Can Superfoods Help Boost the Planet's Health, Too?

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

polaristest / Flickr / CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

By Melissa Kravitz Hoeffner

Over six gallons of water are required to produce one gallon of wine. "Irrigation, sprays, and frost protection all [used in winemaking] require a lot of water," explained winemaker and sommelier Keith Wallace, who's also a professor and the founder of the Wine School of Philadelphia, the largest independent wine school in the U.S. And water waste is just the start of the climate-ruining inefficiencies commonplace in the wine industry. Sustainably speaking, climate change could be problematic for your favorite glass of wine.

Read More Show Less
Pixabay

By Rachael Link, MS, RD

Spinach is a true nutritional powerhouse, as it's rich in vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
Pexels

By Jeff Turrentine

From day to day, our public health infrastructure — the people and systems we've put in place to keep populations, as opposed to individuals, healthy — largely goes unnoticed. That's because when it's working well, its success takes the form of utter normalcy.

Read More Show Less
Spring Break vs. COVID19: The Real Impact of Ignoring Social Distancing

By Eoin Higgins

A viral video showing cell phone data collected by location accuracy company X-Mode from spring break partiers potentially spreading the coronavirus around the U.S. has brought up questions of digital privacy even as it shows convincingly the importance of staying home to defeat the disease.

Read More Show Less
Aerial shot top view Garbage trucks unload garbage to a recycle in the vicinity of the city of Bangkok, Thailand. bugto / Moment / Getty Images

German researchers have identified a strain of bacterium that not only breaks down toxic plastic, but also uses it as food to fuel the process, according to The Guardian.

Read More Show Less