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Major League Baseball Announces Green Glove Award Winner

Business

By Alice Henly

Major League Baseball has announced the San Francisco Giants as the winner of the 2013 Green Glove Award. The Giants had the highest recycling rate in Major League Baseball and diverted the most waste from landfills.

They have achieved a season average waste diversion rate of over 86 percent.

Photo credit: MLB Photos/Natural Resources Defense Council

The top teams in each division and league were also recognized, along with two wild card teams from each league. The teams recognized are listed below:

 

American League

National League

League Champion

Seattle Mariners

San Francisco Giants

East Division Champion

Boston Red Sox

Florida Marlins

Central Division Champion

Minnesota Twins

Pittsburgh Pirates

West Division Champion

Seattle Mariners

San Francisco Giants

Wild Card 1

Oakland Athletics

San Diego Padres

Wild Card 2

Cleveland Indians

Milwaukee Brewers

The Green Glove Award is an annual award recognizing the MLB club with the highest recycling rate. The award is based on self-reported data that the clubs input into MLB GreenTracks and/or report to the MLB Sustainable Operations Committee each year.

MLB GreenTracks is an online software tool for sustainable ballpark management that was launched in 2010. The software system—the first environmental data tracking system of its kind implemented by a professional sports league—collects and analyzes stadium operations data related to energy use, water use, waste generation and paper use to develop and distribute best practice information across the 30 clubs. 

Major League Baseball began an alliance with the Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC) in 2006 to establish the MLB Greening Program in order to  identify and promote better environmental practices. Since 2008, MLB has incorporated environmentally intelligent features in All-Star Week activities, including the MLB All-Star Game, as well as the World Series. 

Recycling protects habitat and saves energy, water, and resources such as trees and metal ores. By recycling paper, cardboard, metals, plastics, and glass, you can help reduce the harmful impacts associated with the extraction of the raw materials used to make these resources, including greenhouse gas emissions, oil spills, deforestation, biodiversity loss and water pollution.

Read more about MLB's greening accomplishments in NRDC's Game Changer report, which includes a preface from MLB Commissioner, Allan H. (Bud) Selig. Find out how they launched their initiative with the NRDC Sports Project to make professional sports a bit greener.

This piece originally appeared on the NRDC's Switchboard Blog.

Visit EcoWatch’s SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS page for more related news on this topic.

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