Quantcast

Major Film Draws Attention to National Audubon Society

National Audubon Society

It’s going to be a big day for birds and Audubon—the country’s leading bird conservation organization—when 20th Century Fox releases The Big Year in theaters on Friday, Oct. 14. The new movie, starring Steve Martin, Owen Wilson and Jack Black, was directed by David Frankel (The Devil Wears Prada, Marley & Me) and is set within the little-known world of competitive birdwatching. Audubon expects the movie to awaken new audiences to the amazing world of birds.

“We are thrilled the birds are getting their first starring role in a major Hollywood film since Hitchcock,” said Audubon President and CEO David Yarnold. “The film tells an entertaining story, and its stars capture the enthusiasm that birds inspire in nearly 50 million Americans.”

Audubon was involved in the making of The Big Year, providing creative and educational materials and support to the production, as well as placement of branded items like its popular Audubon magazine. Audubon is also launching a groundbreaking social media campaign on Oct. 10, which will encourage participants to scour the Internet for birds. Audubon expects the movie and the campaign to spark a renewed appreciation for birds and nature.

“Birds play an important part in our lives,” Yarnold added. “A bird is our most enduring national symbol and birding as a hobby is second only to gardening in popularity among Americans. As we were reminded during the most recent Gulf Oil Spill, we can tell the health of any natural place by the health of the birds that are there.”

The film release will heighten interest in Audubon and its activities, providing a great opportunity for people to find out more about this popular organization, which serves to connect people with birds and nature. Audubon members come from every walk of life and demographic, and with nearly 500 Audubon chapters nationwide, it is easy to get into birding.

In The Big Year, based on the book of the same name by Mark Obmascik, an extraordinary race becomes a transformative journey for wealthy industrialist Stu (Martin), computer code-writer Brad (Black) and successful contractor Kenny (Wilson), who race across the continent on a Big Year, a whirlwind competition to see who can observe the most species of birds in North American within one calendar year.

Audubon’s roots lie in the thrill of competing to collect birds. In the late 19th century, hunters would gather around the holidays to compete over who could shoot the most birds. In 1900, Audubon ornithologist Frank Chapman challenged people to count birds instead of killing them, starting the Christmas Bird Count, and helping to spawn the concept now known as a Big Year.

For more information, click here.

—————

Now in its second century, Audubon connects people with birds, nature and the environment that supports us all. Our national network of community-based nature centers, chapters, scientific, education, and advocacy programs engages millions of people from all walks of life in conservation action to protect and restore the natural world. Visit Audubon online at www.audubon.org.

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

"It would be great to see all the candidates join Elizabeth Warren in taking the No Big Ag Money Pledge," said Citizens Regeneration Lobby's Alexis Baden-Mayer. Peter Blanchard / Flickr / ric (CC BY 2.0)

By Andrea Germanos

Food system justice and environmental advocates on Wednesday urged all Democratic presidential hopefuls to follow in the footsteps of Sen. Elizabeth Warren in signing a pledge rejecting campaign cash from food and agribusiness corporations.

Read More
A new study shows the impact Native Americans had on landscapes was "small" compared to what followed by Europeans. The findings provide important takeaway for conservation in New England today, seen above in a view of areas surrounding Rangeley Lakes in Maine. Cappi Thompson / Moment / Getty Images

There's a theory going around that Native Americans actively managed the land the lived on, using controlled burns to clear forests. It turns out that theory is wrong. New research shows that Native Americans barely altered the landscape at all. It was the Europeans who did that, as ZME Science reported.

Read More
Sponsored
Loggers operate in an area of lodgepole pine trees killed by the mountain pine beetle in the Beaverhead-Deerlodge National Forest on Sept. 13, 2019 in Montana. As climate change makes summers hotter and drier in the Northern Rockies, forests are threatened with increasing wildfire activity, deadly pathogens and insect infestations, including the mountain pine beetle outbreak. The insects have killed more than six million acres of forest across Montana since 2000. Chip Somodevilla / Getty Images

President Donald Trump told a crowd at the Davos World Economic Forum Tuesday that the U.S. will join the Forum's 1t.org initiative to restore and conserve one trillion trees around the world, according to The Hill.

Read More
Wild rice flatbread is one of many Native recipes found in Indigikitchen. Indigikitchen

The online cooking show Indigikitchen is providing a platform to help disseminate Indigenous food recipes — while helping eaters recognize their impact on the planet and Native communities.

Read More

On the Solomon Islands, rats and poachers are the two major threats to critically endangered sea turtles. A group of local women have joined forces to help save the animals from extinction.

Read More