Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Help Support EcoWatch

New French President Set to Clash With Trump Over Climate

Popular

By Andy Rowell

Donald Trump was quick to take to Twitter last night to congratulate the centrist candidate Emmanuel Macron on his resounding victory against the far-right, Marine Le Pen, in the French presidential race.


Trump said: "Congratulations to Emmanuel Macron on his big win today as the next President of France. I look very much forward to working with him!"

As usual with Trump, the tweet is a U-turn from his previous position which was qualified support for the far-right Le Pen. There is no doubt that Trump wanted Le Pen to win.

And as the Guardian noted this morning: "The defeat of Le Pen pricks the bubble of populism that had swept the UK with Brexit and the U.S. with the rise of Trump, and as such may have adverse knock-on effects for the new incumbent of the White House."

One of those issues Macron's win will impact Trump and where the two have to work together is climate change.

The new French president is on record as hoping to persuade Trump not to pull the U.S. out of the Paris climate agreement and the two men look set to clash on the issue.

Although we must remember that Macron is hardly a progressive politician, but an ex-investment banker centrist, the new president has also laid down a provocative marker against Trump on climate. In February this year he released a video on climate change, when he tweeted, "This is a message for American researchers, entrepreneurs, engineers, working on climate change."

Macron invited them to "come to France to join European and French researchers to work on climate change here. Because here you are welcome."

He added: "I do know how your new president now has decided to jeopardize your budget, your initiatives, as he is extremely skeptical about climate change." He went on to say: "I have no doubt about climate change and how committed we have to be regarding this issue."

Macron went on with two messages, the first to French scientists:

"We will preserve our budgets, we will reinforce our public and private investment in order to do more and accelerate our initiatives to deliver in line with COP-21."

The second message was a direct appeal to climate scientists under attack from the Trump administration:

"Come to France! You are welcome. It is your nation. We like innovation. We want innovative people. We want people working on climate change, energy, renewables and new technologies. France is your nation."

Whether any climate scientists move to France remains to be seen. What we do know is that France is a divided nation. And Macron will do well to heal the country's obvious wounds. But Macron also has to stand up against Trump on climate and persuading him to keep the U.S. in the Paris agreement would be a positive start.

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Food Tank

By Danielle Nierenberg and Alonso Diaz

With record high unemployment, a reeling global economy, and concerns of food shortages, the world as we know it is changing. But even as these shifts expose inequities in the health and food systems, many experts hope that the current moment offers an opportunity to build a new and more sustainable food system.

Read More Show Less
Pexels

By Brian J. Love and Julie Rieland

The COVID-19 pandemic has disrupted the U.S. recycling industry. Waste sources, quantities and destinations are all in flux, and shutdowns have devastated an industry that was already struggling.

Read More Show Less
Pixabay

By Kris Gunnars, BSc

Unhealthy foods play a primary role in many people gaining weight and developing chronic health conditions, more now than ever before.

Read More Show Less
A man pushes his mother in a wheelchair down Ocean Drive in South Beach, Miami on May 19, 2020, amid the novel coronavirus pandemic. CHANDAN KHANNA / AFP via Getty Images

The U.S. reported more than 55,000 new coronavirus cases on Thursday, in a sign that the outbreak is not letting up as the Fourth of July weekend kicks off.

Read More Show Less
To better understand how people influence the overall health of dolphins, Oklahoma State University's Unmanned Systems Research Institute is developing a drone to collect samples from the spray that comes from their blowholes. Ken Y. / CC by 2.0

By Jason Bruck

Human actions have taken a steep toll on whales and dolphins. Some studies estimate that small whale abundance, which includes dolphins, has fallen 87% since 1980 and thousands of whales die from rope entanglement annually. But humans also cause less obvious harm. Researchers have found changes in the stress levels, reproductive health and respiratory health of these animals, but this valuable data is extremely hard to collect.

Read More Show Less

Sunscreen pollution is accelerating the demise of coral reefs globally by causing permanent DNA damage to coral. gonzalo martinez / iStock / Getty Images Plus

On July 29, Florida Governor Ron DeSantis signed into law a controversial bill prohibiting local governments from banning certain types of sunscreens.

Read More Show Less

Trending

Oat milk is popping up at coffee shops and grocery stores alike, quickly becoming one of the trendiest plant-based milks. jacqueline / CC by 2.0

By Kelli McGrane

Oat milk is popping up at coffee shops and grocery stores alike, quickly becoming one of the trendiest plant-based milks.

Read More Show Less