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Climate Scientists, Please Come to France, You Are Welcome

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French President Emmanuel Macron is inviting U.S. climate scientists and researchers to move to France with a new website that takes direct aim at Donald Trump.


The Make Our Planet Great Again site, managed by French government agency Business France, provides specific instructions for researchers, teachers and students to apply to open positions in France and finance projects.

The website says:

To All Responsible Citizens:

On the 1st of June, President Donald Trump decided to withdraw the United States from the Paris agreement, which gathered more than 190 countries united against climate change.

This decision is unfortunate but it only reinforced our determination. Don't let it weaken yours.

We are ONE planet and Together, we can make a difference.

France has always led fights for human rights. Today, more than ever, we are determined to lead (and win!) this battle on climate change.

Emmanuel Macron, President of France.

"France will not give up the fight" on climate change, Macron says in the site's video introduction. "Wherever we live, whoever we are, we all share the same responsibility."

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