Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Help Support EcoWatch

Lummi Nation Gather to Denounce Largest Coal Exporting Facility in North America

Energy
Lummi Nation Gather to Denounce Largest Coal Exporting Facility in North America

Coal Train Facts

This photo looks northwest from the exact spot where the proposed coal terminal, North Americas largest, would be built. Photo by Paul K Anderson 2012 - paulkanderson.com.

On Sept. 21, the Hereditary Chief and leaders of the Lummi Nation will gather with the community at Cherry Point, 14 miles northwest of Bellingham, WA, to speak about the importance of working together to honor the ancestors and protect the natural and cultural heritage of Xwe'chi'eXen (Cherry Point), the proposed site of the largest coal exporting facility in North America.

There are ancient names associated with this sacred landscape that are still called out by the Lummi people. Many Lummi families trace their ancestry to those ancient relatives. “It is our promise and our duty to our ancestors, our elders, and to future generations to protect and preserve Cherry Point,” said Clifford Cultee, chairman of the Lummi Nation. A Hereditary Chief of the Lummi Nation, Tsilixw (Bill James), a linguist and cultural historian, supported the chairman’s remarks, noting that Cherry Point is “the home of the ancient ones. Our ancestors are still there.”

Known to the Lummi people by its ancestral name Xwe’chi’eXen, Cherry Point has a deep cultural, historic and spiritual significance to the Lummi people who have a longstanding history of opposing development of the property. Xwe’chi’eXen was the first site in Washington State to be listed on the Washington Heritage Register and is eligible for the National Register of Historic Places.

Xwe'chi'eXen reflects the enduring lifeway on the water of the Lummi people and the many blessings of the Salish Sea. Xwe'chi'eXen was a village site for the Lummi ancestors for over 175 generations where they gathered, fished and collected necessities of daily life. It is an important shellfish, herring, and salmon fishery area, a reef-net site, and is associated with the creation story of the Lummi People and the First Salmon Ceremony. It was also an entryway from inland routes to the islands in the original homeland territory of the Lummi people.

The international dimension of the gathering is reflected in the 2007 United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, whereby the Lummis and their Canadian relatives, along with indigenous peoples around the globe, have the right to maintain and protect their archaeological and historic sites. By action of the President of the U.S. this Declaration applies to the Native Americans today.

In May, hundreds of people protested this proposed coal exporting facility along with five others planned for the region.

Visit EcoWatch’s COAL pages for more related news on this topic.

 

A home burns during the Bobcat Fire in Juniper Hills, California on September 18, 2020. Kyle Grillot / AFP/ Getty Images

By Stuart Braun

"These are not just wildfires, they are climate fires," Jay Inslee, Governor of Washington State, said as he stood amid the charred remains of the town of Malden west of Seattle earlier this month. "This is not an act of God," he added. "This has happened because we have changed the climate of the state of Washington in dramatic ways."

Read More Show Less

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

A new report from Oxfam found that the wealthiest one percent of the world produced a carbon footprint that was more than double that of the bottom 50 percent of the world. PickPik

A new report from Oxfam found that the wealthiest one percent of the world produced a carbon footprint that was more than double that of the bottom 50 percent of the world, The Guardian reported. The study examined 25 years of carbon dioxide emissions and wealth inequality from 1990 to 2015.

Read More Show Less

Trending

The label of one of the recalled thyroid medications. FDA

If you are taking medication for an underactive thyroid, check your prescription.

Read More Show Less
The Metronome, a famous art installation in Union Square that used to display the time of day, has been repurposed into a "Climate Clock" for Climate Week NYC. Zack Winestine

By Jessica Corbett

This story was originally published on Common Dreams on September 19, 2020.

Some advocates kicked off next week's Climate Week NYC early Saturday by repurposing the Metronome, a famous art installation in Union Square that used to display the time of day, as a massive "Climate Clock" in an effort to pressure governments worldwide to take swift, bold action to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and rein in human-caused global heating.

Read More Show Less
Ruth Bader Ginsburg speaks onstage at the event Fourth Annual Berggruen Prize Gala Celebrates 2019 Laureate Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg in New York City on Dec. 16, 2019. Ilya S. Savenok / Getty Images for Berggruen Institute

The passing of U.S. Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg means the nation's highest court has lost a staunch advocate for women's rights and civil rights. Ginsburg was a tireless worker, who continued to serve on the bench through multiple bouts of cancer. She also leaves behind a complicated environmental legacy, as Environment and Energy News (E&E News) reported.

Read More Show Less

Support Ecowatch