Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Help Support EcoWatch

Los Angeles City Councilman Presents Aggressive Greenhouse Gas Proposal

Climate
Los Angeles City Councilman Presents Aggressive Greenhouse Gas Proposal

A Los Angeles city councilman is thinking big and long range when it comes to cutting greenhouse gas emissions.

Paul Koretz said the city should target a cut of 80 percent below 1990 levels by 2050, according to the Los Angeles Times.

"The climate crisis is no longer out there in the future," Koretz told reporters at a news conference Friday. "It's here. It's now."

Los Angeles City Councilman Paul Koretz is pictured in 2013. He has shown a track record of environmental concern since assuming office five years ago. His latest example is an aggressive push for cutting greenhouse gas emissions in the city. Photo credit: @KevinTakumi/Twitter

Boston and San Francisco are among the cities with the aggressive target Koretz suggested. He plans on introducing it in a motion during council's next meeting.

The city is already well on its way to achieving the goal it previously set forth of slashing emissions by 35 percent by 2030. Koretz's office told the publication that Los Angeles had cut emissions 30 percent below 1990 levels by 2013.

Koretz's multilayered plan includes installing more solar energy on city rooftops and energy efficiency retrofits across the city. He also wants the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power to meet the same emissions target two decades before the city.

The department's emissions have dropped 22 percent from 1990's levels, with "even more dramatic" cuts in store as coal is eliminated from the mix at the Navajo and Intermountain power plants, spokesman Joe Ramallo the Times.

"The DWP is almost all the way there," Koretz said. "We just want to give them a nudge to get all the way there."

Koretz has displayed a track record of environmental concern since assuming office five years ago. He was one of two members to introduce a motion for a fracking moratorium last year. He also introduced a motion banning the cultivation and sale of genetically engineered seeds and plants.

 

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Atlantic puffins courting at Maine Coastal Island National Wildlife Refuge in 2009. USFWS / Flickr

When Europeans first arrived in North America, Atlantic puffins were common on islands in the Gulf of Maine. But hunters killed many of the birds for food or for feathers to adorn ladies' hats. By the 1800s, the population in Maine had plummeted.

Read More Show Less
Rescue workers dig through the rubble following a gas explosion in Baltimore, Maryland on Aug. 10, 2020. J. Countess / Getty Images

A "major" natural gas explosion killed two people and seriously injured at least seven in Baltimore, Maryland Monday morning.

Read More Show Less
The recalled list includes red, yellow, white and sweet yellow onions, which may be tainted with salmonella. Pxhere

Nearly 900 people across the U.S. and Canada have been sickened by salmonella linked to onions distributed by Thomson International, the The New York Times reported.

Read More Show Less
Methane flares at a fracking site near a home in Colorado on Oct. 25, 2014. WildEarth Guardians / Flickr

In the coming days, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is expected to use its power to roll back yet another Obama-era environmental protection meant to curb air pollution and slow the climate crisis.

Read More Show Less
Researchers on the ICESCAPE mission, funded by NASA, examine melt ponds and their surrounding ice in 2011 to see how changing conditions in the Arctic affect the biological and chemical makeup of the ocean. NASA / Flickr

By Alex Kirby

The temperature of the Arctic matters to the entire world: it helps to keep the global climate fairly cool. Scientists now say that by 2035 there could be an end to Arctic sea ice.

Read More Show Less
President Vladimir Putin is seen enjoying the Opening Ceremony of the Sochi 2014 Winter Olympics in Sochi, Russia. Pascal Le Segretain / Getty Images

Russia's Health Ministry has given regulatory approval for the world's first COVID-19 vaccine after less than two months of human testing, President Vladimir Putin said on Tuesday.

Read More Show Less

Trending

A John Deere agricultural tractor sits under a collapsed building following a derecho storm on Aug. 10, 2020 near Franklin Grove, Illinois. Daniel Acker / Getty Images

A powerful series of thunderstorms roared across the Midwest on Monday, downing trees, damaging structures and knocking out power to more than a million people.

Read More Show Less