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Living Oceans Society Condemns Northern Gateway Tar Sands Pipeline

Energy
Living Oceans Society Condemns Northern Gateway Tar Sands Pipeline

Living Oceans Society

Photo by Crafty Nature courtesy of Flickr.

Living Oceans Society today condemned the Christy Clark government's long-awaited announcement of a position on the Enbridge Northern Gateway pipeline and tanker proposal. 

Terry Lake, environment minister of British Columbia, laid out these five requirements that new crude oil pipelines will have to meet before getting provincial approval, according to CBC News:

  1. Successful completion of the environmental review process. In the case of Enbridge, that would mean a recommendation by the National Energy Board Joint Review Panel that the project proceed.
  2. World-leading marine oil-spill response, prevention and recovery systems for B.C.'s coastline and ocean to manage and mitigate the risks and costs of heavy oil pipelines and shipments.
  3. World-leading practices for land oil-spill prevention, response and recovery systems to manage and mitigate the risks and costs of heavy oil pipelines.
  4. Legal requirements regarding aboriginal and treaty rights must be addressed, and First Nations provided with the opportunities, information and resources necessary to participate in and benefit from a heavy-oil project.
  5. British Columbia must receive a fair share of the fiscal and economic benefits of a proposed heavy oil project that reflects the level, degree and nature of the risk borne by the province, the environment and taxpayers.

“World-leading marine oil spill response and recovery systems will do nothing for us in the event of a spill of tarsands bitumen,” said Karen Wristen, Living Oceans’ executive director. “First, Enbridge needs to establish to the satisfaction of British Columbians that there exists any technology that could clean up such a spill. When diluted bitumen is spilled into water, much of it sinks to the bottom where conventional spill response technology is simply useless.”

Diluted bitumen, or dilbit, contains a much higher proportion of heavy asphaltenes and resins than conventional oil. These components do not float on water and are highly resistant to dispersant chemicals.

“The rest of the components of dilbit may float for some time, giving off a toxic cloud of benzene, toluene and hydrogen sulphide that would make oil spill response hazardous,” Wristen said. “By the time people could actually get close enough to deploy any kind of surface-cleaning technology, any oil remaining on the surface would be widely dispersed by the action of currents, wind and waves.”

Once the heavier components of the dilbit sink to the ocean floor, it is unknown how long they will persist. The bacteria that degrade conventional oils live on the surface of the water. It is expected that the tar-like goo would smother life on the ocean floor wherever it lands.

“The Kalamazoo River spill in July, 2010 gave us clear evidence that the transportation of dilbit is a dangerous experiment that we don’t know how to control,” said Wristen.  “If a spill were to happen in sensitive near-shore environments, such as the Douglas Channel route into Kitimat, it would impact the entire local ecosystem for decades, perhaps centuries, to come.

Living Oceans has been calling for the Province of British Columbia to withdraw from the federal Joint Review Panel process and conduct an assessment of the real risks for British Columbia, including the risk of increased supertanker traffic in pristine and sensitive North Coast regions.

Visit EcoWatch's ENERGY page for more related news on this topic.

 

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