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Less Stuff: The Transformative Power of Sharing

Less Stuff: The Transformative Power of Sharing

Do you have a garage full of useful stuff? A storage space full of functional items you've outgrown? Or maybe you need some kitchenware for your new apartment or camping gear for the summer. Then it's time to share.

Photo courtesy of Shutterstock

As The Story of Stuff points out, sharing stuff "is easier on our wallets, better for the planet, and terrific for our communities. And while the act of sharing is as old as time, new tech platforms are making sharing easier and more accessible and enabling people to get really creative about sharing everything."

One such platform is yerdle, which aims to turn shoppers into sharers in a "community powered by generosity." Yerdle makes the process simple: members post items they want to give away and yerdle connects them to a grateful receiver. The mission of yerdle is "to reduce the durable consumer goods we all need to buy by 25 percent."

Listen to Annie Leonard from The Story of Stuff talk with Adam Werbach from yerdle to discuss the transformative power of sharing.

As Werbach states, "It's amazing how much stuff we all have." Why not consider sharing?

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