Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Leonardo DiCaprio Meets With Pope Francis to Discuss Need for Immediate Action on Climate Change

Climate

By Vatican

Pope Francis met today during a private audience in Vatican City with actor and environmental activist Leonardo DiCaprio. Their conversation focused on how they can work together to address the immediate need for major action to stop the devastating impacts of climate change from leaving permanent scars on our planet.

Pope Francis and Leonardo DiCaprio meet today in Vatican City to discuss how they can work together to address the immediate need for major action to stop the devastating impacts of climate change. Photo credit: The Vatican

His Holiness sees great urgency in climate change, and has made impassioned pleas before the world community about the threat it poses to our environment, and to the future of human kind. Speaking before a gathering the United Nations General Assembly last September, Pope Francis made this link explicitly clear—any harm done to our environment is harm done to humanity.

The meeting, coming shortly after it was announced that 2015 was officially the hottest year ever recorded, was an opportunity for His Holiness and DiCaprio to specifically identify ways they can inspire and motivate people across the globe to commit to upholding their moral and ethical responsibilities to protect our planet.

Pope Francis and DiCaprio are leading voices in the cause to protect our only home for future generations. Speaking before concerned citizens and leaders of all levels, they have highlighted that this crisis will overwhelmingly impact the poorest and most vulnerable communities of people on earth, making this fight one of fairness, equality and justice.

DiCaprio was accompanied by his father George DiCaprio and Milutin Gatsby, global fundraising chair for the actor's environmental philanthropy, the Leonardo DiCaprio Foundation.

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

15 Florida Mayors to Marco Rubio: We're Going Under, Take Climate Change Seriously

Zika Virus 'Spreading Explosively' in Americas

Leonardo DiCaprio and Nicole Kidman to Attend Torching of Largest Ever Ivory Stockpile to Help Put an End to Poaching

Michael Moore: 'Do Not Send Us Bottles of Water. Instead, Join Us in a Revolt'

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

In Germany's Hunsrück village of Schorbach, numerous photovoltaic systems are installed on house roofs, on Sept. 19, 2019. Thomas Frey / Picture Alliance via Getty Images

Germany's target for renewable energy sources to deliver 65% of its consumed electricity by 2030 seemed on track Wednesday, with 52% of electricity coming from renewables in 2020's first quarter. Renewable energy advocates, however, warned the trend is imperiled by slowdowns in building new wind and solar plants.

Read More Show Less

In many parts of the U.S., family farms are disappearing and being replaced by suburban sprawl.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
General view of the empty Alma bridge, in front of the Eiffel tower, while the city imposes emergency measures to combat the Coronavirus COVID-19 outbreak, on March 17, 2020 in Paris, France. Edward Berthelot / Getty Images

Half the world is on lockdown. So, the constant hum of cars, trucks, trains and heavy machinery has stopped, drastically reducing the intensity of the vibrations rippling through the Earth's crust. Seismologists, who use highly sensitive equipment, have noticed a difference in the hum caused by human activity, according to Fast Company.

Read More Show Less
The current rate of CO2 emissions is a major event in the recorded history of Earth. EPA

By Andrew Glikson

At several points in the history of our planet, increasing amounts of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere have caused extreme global warming, prompting the majority of species on Earth to die out.

Read More Show Less
The "Earthrise" photograph that inspired the first Earth Day. NASA / Bill Anders

For EcoWatchers, April usually means one thing: Earth Day. But how do you celebrate the environment while staying home to prevent the spread of the new coronavirus?

Read More Show Less