Quantcast

Leonardo DiCaprio Joins Carbon Capture Technology Company to 'Bring About a More Sustainable Future for Our Planet'

Climate

Oscar-nominee and environmental philanthropist Leonardo DiCaprio has joined the newly-formed government and policy advisory board of Blue Planet, a prominent developer of carbon capture technology based in Los Gatos, California.

Blue Planet uses patented technology to capture industrial carbon dioxide emissions from power plants and factories and converts it into concrete for commercial and residential construction.

“Our world faces a very grim future if we do not begin to turn back from our current path of climate change,” DiCaprio said in a statement about joining the advisory board. “Innovative technologies like those developed by Blue Planet are integral to the adoption of scalable solutions in every area of our economy."

"I am proud to help this incredible company bring about a more sustainable future for our planet,” he added.

It's safe to say The Revenant star knows a thing or two about carbon capture. According to the announcement, DiCaprio made a personal investment in Blue Planet and produced last year's documentary film Biomimicry, which covered carbon capture technologies, including those developed by the company. Watch here (starts at 7:50):

Many experts believe that carbon capture may prove the only realistic and affordable way to dramatically reduce carbon emissions. The idea is to not only reduce the planet's CO2 footprint but to also create useful building materials.

Daniel Tangherlini, former administrator of the United States General Services Administration, and Durwood Zaelke, president of the Institute for Governance and Sustainable Development, have also joined the Blue Planet advisory board.

“Real sustainability and conservation are achieved by taking a waste product, particularly a harmful one, and putting it to productive, economic use," Tangherlini said. "Blue Planet’s process does just that. It takes one of the most serious problems we face and turns it into materials we can use to rebuild our infrastructure.”

Zaelke stated, “It’s not possible to keep the Planet safe without aggressive carbon removal, nor to meet the goals of the Paris Agreement to ensure no net climate emissions by mid-century and maximum warming of 1.5° C above pre-Industrial levels.”

The company captures industrial carbon dioxide emissions from power plants and factories and transforms it into concrete materials. Photo credit: Blue Planet

Brent Constantz, Blue Planet’s founder and CEO, said in a statement on the formation of the advisory board: “Bringing these leaders together to advise the company will guide our important initiatives with world governments. We encourage policies that promote carbon mitigation technology on a massive scale. We welcome the expertise, passion and unique platforms that Leo, Daniel and Durwood bring to the company. I look forward to working closely with them.”

DiCaprio—who urges a "transition to a clean energy economy that does not rely on fossil fuels"—is a powerful advocate for environmental action. In September 2015, DiCaprio pledged to divest from fossil fuels as part of the Divest Invest Coalition, which encourages business leaders to divest from fossil fuels and in businesses that contribute to climate change and to invest in environmentally conscious companies instead.

He declared that “climate change is severely impacting the health of our planet and all of its inhabitants, and we must transition to a clean energy economy that does not rely on fossil fuels, the main driver of this global problem.”

The UN Messenger of Peace played an active role at the Paris climate talksurging mayors and governors to “commit to no less than 100 percent renewable energy as soon as possible" and he also sits on the advisory board for Powerhive, an energy provider that supplies “affordable, reliable and productive solar electricity to rural communities in the developing world.”

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE 

Supreme Court Deals Blow to EPA’s Clean Power Plan, Obama Vows to Fight

‘World’s Largest Skating Rink’ Provides Carbon-Free Commute

From Hottest Place on Earth in Australia to LA and Ontario’s Winter Heat Waves, 2016 Already on Track to Be Hottest Year Ever Recorded

Gruesome Tumors on Sea Turtles Linked to Climate Change and Pollution

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Scanning electron micrograph of Yersinia pestis, which causes bubonic plague, on proventricular spines of a Xenopsylla cheopis flea. NIAID / Flickr / CC BY 2.0

A middle-aged married couple in China was diagnosed with pneumonic plague, a highly infectious disease similar to bubonic plague, which ravaged Europe in the middle ages, as CNN reported.

Read More Show Less
Milk made from almonds, oats and coconut are among the healthiest alternatives to cow's milk. triocean / iStock / Getty Images Plus

Dairy aisles have exploded with milk and milk alternative options over the past few years, and choosing the healthiest milk isn't just about the fat content.

Whether you're looking beyond cow's milk for health reasons or dietary preferences or simply want to experiment with different options, you may wonder which type of milk is healthiest for you.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
Greta Thunberg stands aboard the catamaran La Vagabonde as she sets sail to Europe in Hampton, Virginia, on Nov. 13. NICHOLAS KAMM / AFP via Getty Images

Greta Thunberg, the teenage climate activist whose weekly school strikes have spurred global demonstrations, has cut short her tour of the Americas and set sail for Europe to attend COP25 in Madrid next month, as The New York Times reported.

Read More Show Less
The Lake Delhi Dam in Iowa failed in 2010. VCU Capital News Service / Josh deBerge / FEMA

At least 1,688 dams across the U.S. are in such a hazardous condition that, if they fail, could force life-threatening floods on nearby homes, businesses, infrastructure or entire communities, according to an in-depth analysis of public records conducted by the the Associated Press.

Read More Show Less

By Sabrina Kessler

Far-reaching allegations about how a climate-sinning American multinational could shamelessly lie to the public about its wrongdoing mobilized a small group of New York students on a cold November morning. They stood in front of New York's Supreme Court last week to follow the unprecedented lawsuit against ExxonMobil.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored

By Alex Robinson

Leah Garcés used to hate poultry farmers.

The animal rights activist, who opposes factory farming, had an adversarial relationship with chicken farmers until around five years ago, when she sat down to listen to one. She met a poultry farmer called Craig Watts in rural North Carolina and learned that the problems stemming from factory farming extended beyond animal cruelty.

Read More Show Less
People navigate snow-covered sidewalks in the Humboldt Park neighborhood on Nov. 11 in Chicago. Scott Olson / Getty Images

Temperatures plunged rapidly across the U.S. this week and around 70 percent of the population is expected to experience temperatures around freezing Wednesday.

Read More Show Less
A general view of the flooded St. Mark's Square after an exceptional overnight "Alta Acqua" high tide water level, on Nov. 13 in Venice. MARCO BERTORELLO / AFP / Getty Images

Two people have died as Venice has been inundated by the worst flooding it has seen in more than 50 years, The Guardian reported Wednesday.

Read More Show Less