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Leonardo DiCaprio Is at It Again, Invests in Energy Technology Company Zuli

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Zuli, creator of the Zuli Smartplug, announced today that world-renowned actor and environmental philanthropist Leonardo DiCaprio has joined the company’s board of advisors. DiCaprio also invested an undisclosed sum in the company, joining a group of existing Zuli advisors and institutional and private investors that includes Menlo Ventures, Logitech, Winklevoss Capital, Guy Kawasaki and Hossein Eslambolchi (Former CTO, AT&T).

With Zuli’s first product, the Zuli Smartplug, just plug it in, connect any light or appliance, and immediately gain control of it from your smartphone. Photo credit: Zuli

Zuli builds proprietary software and hardware that simply optimizes energy efficiency by enabling homes to adapt passively around individual preferences.

“Our world faces an unprecedented climate challenge—but every person can be part of the solution if they commit to making sustainability and conservation part of their daily lives and routines,” said DiCaprio. “Technologies like Zuli empower individuals to turn their homes into models of energy efficiency. This technology is scalable, and an important part of helping reduce an individual’s impact on the environment.”

With Zuli’s first product, the Zuli Smartplug, just plug it in, connect any light or appliance, and immediately gain control of it from your smartphone. The Zuli app allows you to turn appliances on/off, dim lights, set schedules, see energy usage and even estimate monthly costs of all your devices.

The Zuli app allows you to turn appliances on/off, dim lights, set schedules, see energy usage and even estimate monthly costs of all your devices. Photo credit: Zuli

Zuli’s proprietary “Presence” technology can accurately pin-point your location within the home, adjusting lighting, temperature and more to your preferences simply by walking into a room. Zuli also works in the background to passively save energy by shutting off unused devices when you leave a room—cutting off phantom power from devices in idle mode.

“Adding smartphone control to our homes is a great step, but to make them truly smart, we need to be focused on how we enable our homes to learn about what we like, understand our needs contextually, and make autonomous and efficient decisions for us,” Zuli CEO Taylor Umphreys said. “We are pleased to have the involvement of advisors and investors like Leo as we work to put our technology to work in every home in America.”

Zuli is the featured Smartplug on the Works with Nest platform, and enables users to control their Nest temperature and enable Zuli Presence with their thermostat all within the Zuli App. Zuli has also announced upcoming partnerships with Logitech Harmony and Research Frontiers Smartglass.

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