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Leonardo DiCaprio Foundation Grants $650k to Accelerate Climate Change Solutions

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Leonardo DiCaprio Foundation Grants $650k to Accelerate Climate Change Solutions

By R20 Regions of Climate / Leonardo DiCaprio Foundation

Following the April signing of the Paris agreement, R20 Regions of Climate Action (R20) and Leonardo DiCaprio Foundation (LDF) announced the formation of a new partnership to rapidly identify and fund projects that address the urgency of climate change.

Financially supported by LDF under a new $650,000 grant, this partnership allows R20 to rapidly identify renewable energy, energy efficiency and waste management initiatives that have the potential to bring positive environmental and social benefits to communities across the globe and ultimately reduce carbon emissions. Under this framework, R20 will develop and construct these projects, as well as measure and report on their impact.

"Our partnership with R20 is a signal that it is also the responsibility of private organizations to take up the charge of accelerating the adoption of climate-saving technologies, worldwide. We call on others to follow our lead because our planet is quickly running out of time," Leonardo DiCaprio said.

Together, R20 and LDF are following the mission of the Cities Climate Finance Leadership Alliance, (CCFLA) which was launched by UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon in 2014 to encourage investment in low-emission, climate resilient infrastructure in cities and to close the investment gap in climate friendly projects in urban areas over 15 years.

"I commend LDF and R20 for supporting the goals of the CCFLA. Partnerships like this one strengthen the effort to unlock billions of dollars of private investment in projects that will urgently address climate change," Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon said. “I thank them for their commitment to our environment and to the future of humanity."

“The Paris agreement was an important first step for reducing global carbon emissions, but there is more that must be done to accomplish this important goal," Leonardo DiCaprio, chairman of Leonardo DiCaprio Foundation, said. "Our partnership with R20 is a signal that it is also the responsibility of private organizations to take up the charge of accelerating the adoption of climate-saving technologies, worldwide. We call on others to follow our lead because our planet is quickly running out of time."

R20 was founded to support governments and communities in the identification, preparation and financing of green projects to lower greenhouse gas emissions and help the world transition to a green economy.

“R20 and LDF share an unwavering commitment to taking bold action on climate change by supporting proven solutions that will impact real change for our planet," Christophe Nuttall, executive director of R20, said. “With the support of our partners at LDF, we will help set a model for CCFLA members, governments and organizations take action to develop their own climate solutions in all parts of the globe."

R20 was named the Secretariat for the CCFLA in partnership with World Fund for Cities (FMDV), United Nations Environment Program (UNEP) and the United Nations Development Program (UNDP) in January 2016.

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