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Republicans in Congress Flunk Environment and Public Health Report Card With Average Grade of 1%

Politics

Congressional Republican lawmakers have set record lows on the 2017 League of Conservation Voters (LCV) scorecard, released Tuesday.

The LCV, which has been scoring lawmakers' actions on environment, public health and climate issues for nearly 50 years, awarded Senate Republicans a record low average 1 percent score, with 46 Senators receiving a score of zero—meaning "they voted against the environment and public health at every opportunity" in 2017.


House Republicans earned an average of five percent, with the lauded GOP ClimateSolutions Caucus earning a scant 16 percent average.

"There's no getting around it: at the federal level, 2017 was an unmitigated disaster for the environment and public health with President Trump and his Cabinet quickly becoming the most anti-environmental administration in our nation's history," the report said.

As reported by Mother Jones:

"'We've seen the parties have gotten further and further apart,' says Tiernan Sittenfeld, LCV's senior vice president for government affairs, 'and more Democrats have recognized that good climate politics is good politics.'

... The exception is Rep. Brian Fitzpatrick (R-Pa.), who earned the highest of any Republican with 71 percent—a solid C-minus.

'It's unfortunately that 71 percent is now such an outlier,' Sittenfeld notes, 'because it used to be that a number of Republicans voted pro environment.'"

ThinkProgress pointed out that the administration's attacks on the environment and public health have continued incessantly in 2018:

"By all accounts, the Trump administration's deregulatory agenda shows no signs of slowing down in 2018. EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt recently announced plans to reorganize the agency and shutter a program that funds research into how chemicals impact human health, while Secretary of the Interior Ryan Zinke recently reiterated plans to open a historic amount of the United States' coast to offshore drilling."

For a deeper dive:

Mother Jones, ThinkProgress, InsideClimate News, Bloomberg, The Hill

For more climate change and clean energy news, you can follow Climate Nexus on Twitter and Facebook, and sign up for daily Hot News.

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