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LAST HOURS for Humanity?

Climate

Tom Weis

"Consider this: nearly all life on Earth could go extinct because of manmade climate change."

Internationally syndicated talk show host and bestselling author Thom Hartmann released a devastatingly powerful new film, LAST HOURS. A jolting wake-up call for humanity, this 10-minute film describes a terrifying science-based scenario where runaway climate change is triggered by massive releases of frozen methane. Here's the devastating part: the melting of these trillions of tons of carbon is already underway.

"Methane, a powerful greenhouse gas, has already started to percolate into the open seas and atmosphere from methane hydrate deposits beneath melting arctic ice, from the warming northern-hemisphere tundra and from worldwide continental-shelf undersea methane clathrate pools."

"If we do not begin to significantly curtail the use of carbon-based fossil fuels, this freed methane threatens to radically accelerate the speed of global warming, potentially producing a disaster beyond the ability of the human species to adapt."

The film documents how our planet has experienced five major extinctions in geologic history and how our prolific production of greenhouse gases has the ability to trigger a sixth mass extinction.

"By the end of the Permian mass extinction, 95 percent of all life on the planet was dead. And why is this important today? Because today a sixth extinction is underway, one that will test the survival of not just human civilization, but possibly of the human species itself. And it bears a horrifying resemblance to several previous global warming-driven events like the Permian mass extinction."

Earth is sending us an urgent and unmistakable message, one that we ignore at our own peril. Failure to drastically slash carbon emissions now could mean the end of humanity.

Watch and share LAST HOURS with everyone you know. Then take action by supporting Climate Crisis Solution's campaign to stop a major new source of carbon pollution—the 485-mile southern leg of TransCanada's Keystone XL tar sands pipeline. Learn more at RideForRenewables.com.

Visit EcoWatch’s CLIMATE CHANGE page for more related news on this topic.

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