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Largest International Gathering of Water Protection Advocates Meet in Pittsburgh for River Rally 2014

Largest International Gathering of Water Protection Advocates Meet in Pittsburgh for River Rally 2014

When two bodies of water come together in a confluence, each stream provides its unique characteristics to form a more powerful entity. Much as the Monongahela and Allegheny rivers combine to form the mighty Ohio River, the same can be said of River Rally 2014, when River Network and Waterkeeper Alliance join forces to convene the largest gathering ever of clean water advocates.

From May 30-June 2, more than 700 national and international environmental leaders will join together in Pittsburgh, PA to share best practices for watershed restoration, stormwater management, water quality monitoring, water and energy conservation, green infrastructure, habitat restoration, safe drinking water and more.

For the second time, River Network and Waterkeeper Alliance are joining forces to host River Rally. Participants will hail from more than 40 U.S. states as well as Bangladesh, Bolivia, Brazil, Canada, Chile, China, Colombia, Czech Republic, Ecuador, India, Iraq, Mexico, Peru, Senegal and the United Kingdom.

Where:  Westin Convention Center Pittsburgh Hotel, 1000 Penn Ave., Pittsburgh, PA

What: More than 70 intensive workshops and technical training sessions, and a dozen field trips including River Cleanup Service Project

Highlights include:

Ma Jun, Environmental Consultant and Journalist, China
Engaging Citizens to Monitor and Address Increasing Environmental Pollution in China
Saturday May 31, 8:30 - 9:30 a.m.

Fracking: Impacts, Science and Advocacy Plenary Panel
Emily Collins-University of Pittsburgh Environmental Law Clinic; John H. Quigley, former Secretary of the Pennsylvania Department of Conservation and Natural Resources; Hollin Kretzmann, Staff Attorney for the Center for Biological Diversity; Jordan Yeager, Partner and Chair of the Environmental and Public Sector Section for Curtin & Heefner LLP.
Saturday, May 31, Noon - 1 p.m.

His Holiness the Gyalwang Drupka and Robert F. Kennedy, Jr., Senior Attorney for Natural Resources Defense Council, President of Waterkeeper Alliance
Saturday, May 31, 8 - 9 p.m. Keynote

Secretary Sally Jewell, U.S. Department of the Interior
The State of U.S. Waters
Monday, June 2, 12:30 - 1:30 p.m.

River Heroes Awards Banquet
Celebrating rivers and honoring five individuals who provide us with leadership and inspiration.
Monday, June 2, 6 - 9 p.m.

Sponsors: Bridgestone Americas, Turner Foundation, Colcom Foundation, Coca-Cola Company, Patagonia, Toyota, Swedish Postcode Foundation, Budweiser, U.S. Forest Service, KEEN Footwear, Walton Family Foundation, Planet, Inc. and dozens more.

For more information or to register, click here.

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