Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Help Support EcoWatch

Landowners Call for Rejection of Keystone XL Tar Sands Pipeline

Energy

Sierra Club

Below is a recap of this week’s news related to the Keystone XL tar sands pipeline. With last week’s announcement of a new permit application submitted by TransCanada, this week saw fresh calls from landowners and concerned citizens for officials to reject anew the risky tar sands pipeline project, once and for all. See below for more:

News & Developments:

The new application by TransCanada has allowed for the real people who will be directly impacted by Keystone XL to voice their opposition to the project, which will compromise their land and livelihoods. It turns out the Keystone XL pipeline has made what Esquire called “accidental activist[s]” out of the ranchers and farmers who TransCanada has bullied for rights to their land, folks like Nebraskan Randy Thompson and Texan Julia Trigg Crawford, who was featured in the New York Times this week.

Randy and Julia are not alone in their negative reactions toward the Keystone XL tar sands pipeline. As the Omaha World Herald observed after attending the first meeting held by Nebraska Department of Environmental Quality, “The majority of landowners, in face-to-face conversations with state and pipeline officials, said the new route was no better and still crossed areas with high water tables and fragile, sandy soils like those in the Sand Hills.”

Experts continue to debunk the widespread GOP myth that the Keystone XL pipeline will do anything to reduce gas prices. In fact, Rita Chapman, clean water program director at the Sierra Club of Michigan, points out in an op-ed in the Detroit Free Press this week, TransCanada itself admits the pipeline would "realize an increase in the heavy crude price of approximately $3 per barrel."

In the piece, Chapman goes on to explain how the risks of the Keystone XL tar sands pipeline far outweigh any fabricated benefits.

An exposé in Inside Climate News reveals why the Koch brothers are so committed to seeing the Keystone XL pipeline through to fruition. David Sasson explores how “long involvement in Canada's tar sands has been central to Koch Industries' evolution and positions the billionaire brothers for a new oil boom.”

TransCanada faces a different battle in a new state as Kansas officials attempt to revoke tax exempt status from the foreign company. Portions of the original, operational Keystone pipeline run through Kansas, delivering oil to Oklahoma.

The Associated Press reports “[The Kansas Department of Revenue] estimates TransCanada owes nearly $19 million in 2011 property taxes for the pipeline that's been operating since last year. The department says the pipeline doesn't meet a requirement that Kansas refineries must have access to the oil in order for TransCanada to get the exemption.”

Quotes of the Week:

“No matter what they say, this is still the Sand Hills. It's delicate ground. This is hurting awful bad.” Nebraskan rancher Laura Meusch, after learning the new permit application for the Keystone XL pipeline would still cross her land.  

“My discussions, without naming names, is that nobody wants this to stop the transportation conference report from going forward as quickly as possible—pro or con.” House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee ranking member Rep. Nick Rahall

In Case You Missed It

Game Over for the Climate—James Hansen, who directs the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies and is the author of “Storms of My Grandchildren,” writes in the New York Times about the “apocalyptic” impacts of fully exploiting Canada’s tar sands and neglecting to drastically reduce global carbon emissions.

New transportation bill must be free of Keystone contamination—The Editorial Board of the STLtoday urge the transportation conference committee to keep the bill clean.

Spinning the facts again on climate emissions from tar sands—Danielle Droitsch, Director of the Canada Project with NRDC, blogs about the science that show emissions from tar sands are some of the most carbon-intensive on earth, and how a single, new study from the Alberta government can’t change that fact.

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Activists of Greenpeace and Fridays For Future demonstrate on a canal in front of the cooling tower of the coal-fired power plant Datteln 4 of power supplier Uniper in Datteln, western Germany, on May 20. INA FASSBENDER / AFP / Getty Images

The Bundestag and Bundesrat — Germany's lower and upper houses of parliament — passed legislation on Friday that would phase out coal use in the country in less than two decades as part of a road map to reduce carbon emissions.

Read More Show Less
Pixabay

By Tara Lohan

Would you like to take a crack at solving climate change? Or at least creating a road map of how we could do it?

Read More Show Less
Climate campaigners and Indigenous peoples across Canada have spent the past several years protesting the Trans Mountain pipeline. Mark Klotz / Flickr / cc

By Elana Sulakshana

Rainforest Action Network recently uncovered a document that lists the 11 companies that are currently insuring the controversial Trans Mountain tar sands pipeline in Canada. These global insurance giants are providing more than USD$500 million in coverage for the massive risks of the existing Trans Mountain pipeline, and they're also lined up to cover the expansion project.

Read More Show Less
Pexels

By Leah Campbell

After several months of stay-at-home orders due to the COVID-19 pandemic, many households are beginning to experience family burnout from spending so much time together.

Read More Show Less
Food Tank

By Danielle Nierenberg and Alonso Diaz

With record high unemployment, a reeling global economy, and concerns of food shortages, the world as we know it is changing. But even as these shifts expose inequities in the health and food systems, many experts hope that the current moment offers an opportunity to build a new and more sustainable food system.

Read More Show Less
Pexels

By Brian J. Love and Julie Rieland

The COVID-19 pandemic has disrupted the U.S. recycling industry. Waste sources, quantities and destinations are all in flux, and shutdowns have devastated an industry that was already struggling.

Read More Show Less

Trending

Pixabay

By Kris Gunnars, BSc

Unhealthy foods play a primary role in many people gaining weight and developing chronic health conditions, more now than ever before.

Read More Show Less