Quantcast

Landmark Federal Study Links Cell Phone Radiation to Brain Cancer

Health + Wellness

The radiation emitted from wireless devices could cause brain cancer, according to a multi-year study from the federal National Toxicology Program (NTP).

The results appear to confirm human evidence used by the World Health Organization that declared cell phone radiation a possible carcinogen.

The radiation emitted from wireless devices could cause brain cancer, according to a multi-year study. Photo credit: Shutterstock

The research found that male rats exposed to radio-frequency (RF) radiation had a greater chance of being diagnosed with a brain cancer called malignant glioma, as well as developing a tumor found on the heart. The radiation levels the rats were exposed to included power levels that current cell phones are allowed to emit.

This study from the National Toxicology Program, part of the National Institute for Health, was conducted on laboratory animals to help determine what the potential risks might be for people, noted Environmental Working Group (EWG) President Ken Cook.

“The federal government isn’t exposing rats to cell phone radiation because we’re concerned about rats getting cancer from cell phone use,” Cook said. “These studies are done because of their relevance to people and this particular study raises serious concerns.”

“By confirming the connection between cell phone radiation and malignant tumors in male rats, the NTP’s study raises concerns for risks to people to a new level,” said David Andrews, PhD, a senior scientist with EWG.

David Carpenter, director of the School of Public Health at State University of New York at Albany, who has followed the issue closely said the study “won't end the debate, but I can't imagine anything with more credibility than an NTP report."

Carpenter told EWG he thought the report could spur other health organizations to take a fresh look at the issue, including the World Health Organization’s International Agency for Research on Cancer, which in 2011 classified cell phone radiation as a “possible carcinogen.”

EWG has been at the forefront of public interest organizations raising concerns about cell phone use and cancer. The 10-year, $25 million study confirms reports by EWG from 2009 and 2013 highlighting the potential health risks from cell phones and wireless devices.

EWG’s 2009 report spotlighted comprehensive review studies that showed increased risk of two types of brain tumors, including glioma.

In an effort to help concerned consumers take steps to protect themselves and their families, EWG has created tools and tips that can help reduce exposure to radiation from cell phones, including our Guide to Safer Cell Phone Use and one to help pick the best cell phone case to mitigate radiation exposure.

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

Glyphosate Found in Urine of 93 percent of Americans Tested

13 Worst-Rated Sunscreens for Kids

Will Congress End the Era of Unlimited, Untested Chemicals and Reform TSCA?

Federal Toxics Law Still Protecting the Chemical Industry’s Dirty Secrets

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

California Condor at soaring at the Grand Canyon. Pavliha / iStock / Getty Images

North America's largest bird passed an important milestone this spring when the 1,000th California condor chick hatched since recovery efforts began, NPR reported Sunday.

Read More Show Less
The Roloway monkey has been pushed closer to extinction. Sonja Wolters / WAPCA / IUCN

The statistics around threatened species are looking grim. A new report by the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) has added more than 9,000 new additions to its Red List of threatened species, pushing the total number of species on the list to more than 105,000 for the first time, according to the Guardian.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
Golde Wallingford submitted this photo of "Pure Joy" to EcoWatch's first photo contest. Golde Wallingford

EcoWatch is pleased to announce our third photo contest!

Read More Show Less
BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI / AFP / Getty Images

The campaign to re-elect President Donald Trump has found a new way to troll liberals and sea turtles.

Read More Show Less
Night long exposure photograph of wildifires in Santa Clarita, California. FrozenShutter / E+ / Getty Images

By Kristy Dahl

Last week, UCS released Killer Heat, a report analyzing how the frequency of days with a dangerously hot heat index — the combination of temperature and humidity the National Weather Service calls the "feels like" temperature — will change in response to the global emissions choices we make in the coming decades.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
A Zara store in Times Square, Causeway Bay, Hong Kong. Timahaowemi / CC BY-SA 3.0

Green is the new black at Zara.

The Spanish fast fashion behemoth has made a bold move to steer its industry to a more environmentally friendly future for textiles. Inditex, Zara's parent company, announced that all the polyester, cotton and linen it uses will be sustainably produced by 2025, as CNN reported.

Read More Show Less
Pexels

By Gavin Van De Walle, MS, RD

Whether you enjoy running recreationally, competitively, or as part of your overall wellness goals, it's a great way to improve your heart health.

Read More Show Less
Text from the plaque that will mark the site where Ok glacier once was. Rice University

By Andrea Germanos

A climate change victim in Iceland is set to be memorialized with a monument that underscores the urgent crisis.

Read More Show Less