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A Kardashian’s Appeal for Safer Kids Products

Health + Wellness
A Kardashian’s Appeal for Safer Kids Products
Reality TV-Star Kourtney Kardashian speaks at a briefing in support of bipartisan personal care products legislation aimed at reforming how the FDA regulates the personal care products industry in the Russell Senate Office Building on April 24 in Washington, DC. Paul Morigi / Getty Images

By Robert Coleman

When we first told Kourtney Kardashian that the law which regulates the ingredients in personal care products—which also means children's care products—had not been updated in 80 years, she was appalled.


She wanted to do something. She asked if there was anything she could do to make a difference.

Skip to April, when Kourtney and the production crew from Keeping Up With The Kardashians joined the team at the Environmental Working Group (EWG) to visit Capitol Hill and advocate for commonsense regulations on ingredients in personal care products.

Kardashian came to Washington not only for herself but also for her three children. She feels parents shouldn't have to worry about the products they use on their children every day. "Parents have enough to think about," she said.

At a briefing for congressional staff, Kardashian said her crusade began when Mason, her first child, was born.

I would get so many baby gifts and a lot of skincare products for my kids. I would use the things that people sent me, assuming the baby products would be safe. And I remember learning from my mom friends that these were not healthy at all.

As the current session of Congress comes to a close, it's looking more and more like we're going to have to wait until January, when a new Congress is seated, to pass this vital legislation.

But until our lawmakers get to work and pass these commonsense reforms, here are EWG resources you can use to make sure your kids are using safer personal care products.

  • Make sure to use EWG's Guide to Sunscreens to find the best sun protection for your family, especially during the summer and while on vacation.
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