Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Knox College Students Build Rain Gardens for Their Campus

Popular
Knox College Students Build Rain Gardens for Their Campus
Knox College students in the course 'Examining the Anthropocene' planting a rain garden to control water runoff. Knox College / Peter Bailley / Yale Climate Connections

Last spring, students at Knox College in Illinois traded their notebooks for shovels and planted a rain garden on campus. The garden is not just a bunch of pretty plants. It's designed to reduce stress on the campus drainage system during heavy rain.


"The whole goal behind the rain gardens is … slow it, spread it, and sink it," says associate professor William Hope. "And that is to take the movement of the water and slow it down such that it loses energy and rather spreads out and sinks into the earth."

He says the project's engineered so that rain comes from the roof of a nearby building, through downspouts, and into a bed of gravel. Then it flows into the garden. The plants' roots hold the soil in place and help absorb the water.

This is the second rain garden that Hope has helped his students design and build. And he says they've walked away each time more observant and motivated to design solutions for their communities.

"Several students across the years have commented that this has given them a physical connection to campus in ways that they felt proud of," he says. "That they would come back and share their stories, importantly, and their experiences of doing this project with friends and family."

Reposted with permission from Yale Climate Connections.

Starfish might appear simple creatures, but the way these animals' distinctive biology evolved was, until recently, unknown. FangXiaNuo / Getty Images

By Aaron W Hunter

A chance discovery of a beautifully preserved fossil in the desert landscape of Morocco has solved one of the great mysteries of biology and paleontology: how starfish evolved their arms.

Read More Show Less

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

U.S. President Joe Biden sits in the Oval Office as he signs a series of orders at the White House in Washington, D.C. on January 20, 2021. Jim Watson / AFP / Getty Images

President Joe Biden officially took office Wednesday, and immediately set to work reversing some of former President Donald Trump's environmental policies.

Read More Show Less

Trending

Erik McGregor / LightRocket / Getty Images

In many schools, the study of climate change is limited to the science. But at the University of Minnesota, Twin Cities, students in one class also learn how to take climate action.

Read More Show Less
Pexels

By Daniel Raichel

Industry would have us believe that pesticides help sustain food production — a necessary chemical trade-off for keeping harmful bugs at bay and ensuring we have enough to eat. But the data often tell a different story—particularly in the case of neonicotinoid pesticides, also known as neonics.

Read More Show Less
A Fridays for Future activist on Oct. 9, 2020 in Turin, Italy. Stefano Guidi / Getty Images

By Andrea Germanos

Fed up with "empty promises" from world leaders, a dozen youth activists on Wednesday demanded newly sworn-in President Joe Biden and Vice President Kamala Harris take swift and bold climate action — even more far-reaching than promised on the campaign trail — stating that their "present and future depend on the actions your government takes within the next four years."

Read More Show Less