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Kevin Spacey Is The Rainforest

Climate

Kevin Spacey is The Rainforest in Conservation International’s third film in its provocative environmental awareness campaign, Nature Is Speaking.

Watch as The Rainforest comes to life and reminds humans that rainforests make life possible. "I have always been there for them and I have been more than generous. Sometimes, I've given it all to them, now gone forever," states The Rainforest.

"Nature's message is clear: we can't keep doing what we're doing now. Clean sustainable energy is crucial and cannot wait ... we have to start listening to nature now," said Spacey.

Did you know rainforests filter water, offer medications and release oxygen.

According to Conservation International:

  • Every second a slice of rainforest the size of a football field is mowed down.
  • Deforestation accounts for more greenhouse gas emissions than all of the cars and trucks on Earth combined.
  • Forests are the lungs of the Earth. They absorb carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and release oxygen.

Conservation International is working to ensure important forests are protected, including an area of about 99 million acres close to the size of the state of California. However this isn't enough, Conservation International is working to change the global economic framework that currently tells us trees are worth more cut than standing.

Nature Is Speaking is a series of short films voiced by some of the biggest names in Hollywood including Penélope Cruz, Harrison Ford, Edward Norton, Robert Redford, Julia Roberts, Ian Somerhalder and Kevin Spacey.

Help share this great film by using the #NatureIsSpeaking hashtag on social media platforms. HP will donate $1 to Conservation International each time the hashtag is used.

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